2011 - 2012

Invisible Diasporas: Afro-Modernism in Italy

Brown Bag Lecture
Apr 25, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM

Sara Marzioli, Department of Comparative Literature, Penn State

Sara Marzioli's research project is based on the extensive archival research she has conducted both in Italy and in the U.S. She suggests Italy as a vantage point from which to study the engagements of African American intellectuals with political and cultural forms of black internationalism. To this purpose, her work brings into conversation twentieth century African-American and Italian writers and film directors, whose work addresses the dialectic between historiography and fiction, racial relations and modernity. Key figures discussed in her investigation include Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Marcus Garvey, Curzio Malaparte, George Schuyler, Ralph Ellison, William Demby, Pier Paolo Pasolini and Spike Lee. The catalyst in the work of these writers is the symbolic and real import of Africa elaborated at the crossroad between Harlem, Rome, and Addis Ababa, which Italy occupied in 1935.

Sara Marzioli is a Ph.D. student in Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University. Her dissertation brings into conversation twentieth century African-American and Italian writers and film directors, whose work addresses the intersections of history and fiction with modernity and racial discourses, within the framework of the Black Transatlantic. She has recently submitted to African American Review an article on William Demby’s The Catacombs, a novel set in Rome and has under consideration by Atlantic Studies an essay on Ralph Ellison’s intervention on forms of world black solidarity seen through the locale of Rome.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

The Intimacies of Information

Presentation on the "information age"
Apr 23, 2012
03:30 PM to 05:30 PM
008 Mueller

Michael Denning and the Yale University Working Group on Globalization and Culture

In recent decades, social theorists have proclaimed the advent of an “information age.” “Information” is a keyword of contemporary culture, and information technologies are intimate parts of our daily lives, informing and informing on us. This collective presentation by the Working Group on Globalization and Culture explores the intimacies of information, the secret lives of codes: the dynamics of sharing, disguising, and restricting information; the labors of making, storing, and transmitting information; the intertwining of data, sexuality and emotion; the wars of disinformation and secret intelligence; the contests over access to and control over information, as it is managed, copied, hidden, commodified, corrupted, leaked, and pirated. Information alters our bodies even as bodily information is translated and transcribed in archives and databases. How, we ask, do we live with information, and how do we live without it?


The Future of Food Ethics

Lecture in Food Ethics Series
Apr 23, 2012
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Jonathan H. Marks, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.

Culture in the Age of One World

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 23, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Michael Denning, Yale University

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Genocide, Science, and Ethnosuicide, The Extirpation of Idolitries in the Colonial Andes and a Contemporary Variant

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 16, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jose Rabasa, Harvard

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

A film screening by the Chiapas Media Project, a project of the Americas Media Initiative

Film screening
Apr 13, 2012
02:00 PM to 03:00 PM
117 HUB, Robeson Center

Alex Halkin

Please join us for a film screening provided by the Chiapas Media Project, a project of the Americas Media Initiative. The Chiapas Media Project (CMP)/Promedios is an award winning, bi-national partnership that provides video equipment, computers and training enabling marginalized indigenous communities in Southern Mexico to create their own media. Since 1998, CMP instructors have worked in close collaboration with autonomous Zapatista communities. Indigenous youth with little formal education, and often working without reliable electricity, have produced videos on agricultural collectives, fair trade coffee, women’s collectives, autonomous education, traditional healing and the history of their struggle for land.

The Films:

Living Juárez: Collateral Damage in Mexico's Drug War (20 minutes) looks at the Ciudad Juárez neighborhood where in January 2010, of a group of youth attending a birthday party were brutally murdered. In the aftermath, Calderón characterized the youth as gang members, and outraged families confronted Calderón at public forums.

Paying the Price (35 minutes) examines the lives of migrant workers from the town of Ayotzinapa, Guerrero. We follow them from their community to a large Sinaloa agribusiness camp, Buen Año, where they pick exotic Chinese vegetables for export to the US and Canada. We see the hardships faced by these workers in their community of origin, largely abandoned by the local and state governments

For more information, please visit:

Building the Kingdom in the Countryside: Christian Missionaries, Agriculture, and Globalization

Brown Bag Lecture Series
Apr 11, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
402 Burrowes

Kevin Lowe, Department of History, Penn State

This presentation will explore ways in which U.S. missionaries became involved in international efforts to develop agriculture and rural life in the post-World War II world. Often overlooked as political actors, missionaries nevertheless had an important part to play in determining the shape of globalization in contemporary agriculture.

Kevin Lowe is a doctoral candidate in American religious history. He received his bachelor's in religious studies from Cornell University and a master's in early Christian history from Drew University.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields

 


Desire, Disease, and the Grotesque Charles Burns Black Hole

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 09, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Scott Smith, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


So Close and Yet So Far: Film-making in Baja California

Lecture
Apr 05, 2012
04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
124 Sparks

Carlos Carrillo and René Castillo

Nobel Panel: On Tranströmer

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 02, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Aldon Nelson, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Commemorations, Commemorators and Commemorated: Unveiling the Politics of France’s Remembrance of Slavery

Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 28, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
402 Burrowes

Sophia Khadraoui, Department of French and Francophone Studies, Penn State

May 10, 2007: three immense, two-meter-high triangular columns (two in steel, one in wood) each engraved in their negative space with a pregnant silhouette of Solitude, an historical figure of slave resistance in Guadeloupe, emerge in Bagneux, a suburb of Paris. Through nine sculptures and monuments this research questions the process of the memorialization of slavery and its abolition in the French metropolitan cityscape since 1998, the 150th anniversary of the abolition of slavery. Socially, historically and/or politically; how are these artifacts used as narrative tools by the state, associations and communities as each party struggles to convey its own perspective of a shared violent past? By studying France’s artistic recognition of slavery and its abolition, this research not only considers slavery with respect to its intimate ties to current questions surrounding race, identity and immigration but also contributes to a larger understanding of slavery in the former European empires, Africa, and the Americas, for scholars who would want to highlight the specificities, perspectives and emphasis that each national site put forward in their process of remembrance of their common slave past.

Sophia Khadraoui is an ABD student in French and Francophone Studies. She is currently writing her dissertation “Sculpted Memories: Commemorating the Abolition of Slavery in Metropolitan France through Monuments”. Her research interests include questions of race and identity and their repercussions in history and memory. She earned an M.A. in American Civilization from La Sorbonne Nouvelle University, Paris III and another in French Civilization from The Pennsylvania State University.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

From Tokyo to Mexico City via Moscow and New York: An International "Street Car Named Desire"

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 26, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Djelal Kadir, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Cultivating Connections: Collaborative Innovation for Global Health hosted by Globe Med

Global Health Conference
Mar 23, 2012
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Henderson Building

Dr. Richard Heinzl, founder of the North American Chapter of Doctors Without Borders

Register for FREE at http://psuglobalhealthconference.weebly.com.

The 5th Annual Global Health Conference will emphasize how individuals have unique perspectives, and through an integrated approach we can inspire innovative solutions to mold our future.  Innovation is born through collaborative efforts when a one-dimensional plan grows into a multifaceted solution.  Innovation has the power to provide pragmatic solutions to everyday problems in developing world and represents an image of how to bridge the gap between entrepreneurs, scientists and philanthropists.  It is critical to increase cohesion in these fields to inspire political infrastructure, scientific development and practical business plans while maintaining a commitment to equity.  The task at hand requires integration of these tandem components; using them to facilitate change, harnessing this innovative power and using it to combat inequities in health.  

Dr. Richard Heinzl, founder of the North American Chapter of Doctors Without Borders, will be giving the keynote address on Friday at 7:00 pm in the Henderson Living Center. Check in for the main portion of the conference will occur on Saturday morning from 9:00 - 9:30 a.m. in the Henderson lobby. Opening remarks will begin promptly at 9:30 a.m. in the Henderson Living center. There will be a series of 3 workshops and a panel discussion lasting until 4:30 p.m. Morning refreshments and lunch will be provided for all attendees. The benefit dinner in support of our partner organization in El Salvador will be held from 6 - 9pm in the Henderson Living Center.

Touch of Culture: Eastern Europe

K-12 event
Mar 23, 2012
05:30 PM to 08:30 PM
Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School

A presentation of the arts, food, and culture of the countries that comprise Eastern Europe.


Controlling Corruption - Lessons Learned from Around the World

Lecture on corruption
Mar 22, 2012
06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
116 Katz Building

Robert Klitgaard

Robert Klitgaard, Professor and former President at the Claremont Graduate University and a leading expert on systemic government corruption, will discuss strategies that have brought it under control in a number of countries and how that experience might be applied to those countries that still suffer from it.

Klitgaard has advised many governments on economic strategy and institutional reform, and his consulting work and research have taken him to more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. He has been called “the world's leading expert on corruption” (The Christian Science Monitor). In recent years he has served on the faculty of the World Economic Forum, the editorial boards of the Journal of Economic Literature and Theoria, and the Board of the International Development Evaluation Association. In addition to many articles, Klitgaard has written eight books on business and corruption.

This event is sponsored by Penn State School of International Affairs, Center for Global Studies and Smeal College of Business.

Under-Documented Migrations: Narrating Against Border Enforcement

Lecture series on migrant issues
Mar 22, 2012
04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
124 Sparks

Julie Minich, Miami University and Jennifer Harford Vargas, Bryn Mawr University

This lecture series features two talks Irrational Journeys: Racialized Aging and Melancholia in Border-Crossing Narratives by Guillermo Arriaga, Tommy Lee Jones, and Oscar Casares by Julie Minich -- Assistant Professor of English; Affiliate, Latin American, Latina/o and Caribbean Studies Affiliate, Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies -- at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio and Entering through el Hueco and Living in las Entrañas:  The Colombian Undocumented Migrant Imaginary in Jorge Franco’s Paraíso Travel by Jennifer Harford Vargas, Assistant Professor of English, at Bryn Mawr University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and Latin American Studies.

Internship and Career Opportunities Information Session

Career Development Session
Mar 20, 2012
03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Katz Auditorium

Interested in working with the U.S. Government? Representatives from the U.S. Intelligence Community are holding an information session to discuss various student internships, fellowships and career opportunities in the U.S. government.  Undergraduate and graduate students with a U.S. citizenship and an interest in pursuing a career in public service are encouraged to attend.

Sponsored by Strategic and Global Security Scholars Program, The School of International Affairs, and The Center for Global Studies.

Literature and Politics in Communist Albania and the Parables of Dictatorship in the Prose of Ismail Kadare

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 17, 2012
02:00 PM to 04:00 PM
102 Kern

Interested in learning more about careers with a global focus? Join us for the School of international Affairs Career Panel Discussion. The alumni panelists will include representatives from the following NGOs, State Government, higher education, and consulting agencies: Booz Allen Hamilton, USAID, Susquehanna University, Penn State University, Office of the Director of Global HIV/AIDS, and Corporate Council for Africa. An informal Q&A will follow.


Rethinking Comparativism from the Latin American Point of View

Lecture
Mar 15, 2012
06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
111 Chambers

Eduardo de Faria Coutinho


Behind the Scenes in Baja California: Movies Are More than What We See

Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 14, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
402 Burrowes

Leisa Rothlisberger, Department of Comparative Literature, Penn State

Even though we are constantly bombarded by media, we are not always aware of the geographical provenance of what we see onscreen. By visiting a location--the state of Baja California, Mexico--where many Hollywood productions have been filmed outside of the United States, Leisa was able to learn how the relationship between culture and territory has changed with the policies that have accelerated globalization. She will share some of the insights from meeting with filmworkers who have worked on Hollywood productions in Mexico and government officials who are molding policies that directly affect foreign productions that choose to film in Baja California. She will address how the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has influenced cultural exchange between the United States and Mexico.

Leisa Rothlisberger is completing her PhD in the Department of Comparative Literature at Penn State. Her dissertation, NAFTA Culture: Trade Policy and Cultural Exchange in the Global Era, focuses on the interconnections between NAFTA and cultural products in the U.S. and Mexico. She is currently a Graduate Fellow of the Rock Ethics Institute.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

The Teleologies of Modernism: Toward a Transitional Theory

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 12, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Christopher Hill, Columbia University

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series and Modern Asian Literature Series.


Foreign Language Education in Early Childhood

K-12 event
Mar 01, 2012
06:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School

Envisioning a Future World: Climate Change, Knowledge Exchange, and Opportunities Abroad

Brown Bag Series
Feb 29, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
402 Burrowes

Katie Dietrich, Department of Geography, Penn State

Katie Dietrich is a PhD student in Geography and has been working in Ghana for the past five years. Her current work considers the collaborations,

knowledge exchange, and learning between rural communities, researchers, and local NGO workers while engaging in a scenario building activity that looks to a future under climate uncertainty. For her masters, she researched water resource management and responses to climate uncertainty in rural communities. When not in Ghana, Katie participates in several climate change conferences and thus enjoys the numerous opportunities to travel.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

Lu Xun and Lu Sin and 魯迅: New Script (Sin Wenz) and the Staging of Language Reform

Modern Asian Literature Series
Feb 28, 2012
04:15 PM to 05:15 PM
124 Sparks

Michael Hill, University of South Carolina

This lecture is part of the Modern Asian Literature Series sponsored by the Confucius Institute at Penn State with support from the Asian Studies Program and the Center for Global Studies.


Being There: Writing from the Indian Sub-Continent

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 27, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Sharmista Mohanty, Indian Writer

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Reading China During the German Enlightenment

Lecture on China
Feb 25, 2012
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Reading China During the German Enlightenment

Lecture on China
Feb 24, 2012
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Translating the Past, Reenchanting the Present: An Antiquarian in Colonial Korea

Modern Asia Literature Series
Feb 21, 2012
04:30 PM to 05:30 PM
402 Burrowes

Janet Poole, University of Toronto

This lecture is part of the Modern Asian Literature Series sponsored by the Confucius Institute at Penn State with support from the Asian Studies Program and the Center for Global Studies.


Walmart in China: Work, Politics, and Ideology

Lecture on Walmart in China
Feb 21, 2012
12:30 PM to 01:45 PM
502 Keller

Nelson Lichtenstein, University of California, Santa Barbara

Nelson Lichtenstein is author of The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (2009) and a contributor to Anita Chan's Walmart in China, a collection of essays by Chinese and American researchers probing the work regime in Walmart's Chinese stores and supplier factories, as well as the prospects for unionization of those facilities. Dr. Lictenstein is Director of the Center for the Study of Work, Labor, and Democracy at the University of California, Santa Barbara and MacArthur Foundation Chair and Professor in History. His earlier award-winning books on labor history include Walter Reuther: The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit (1995), Labor’s War at Home: The CIO in World War II (1982) and State of the Union: A Century of American Labor (2002).

This event is co-sponsored by Penn State's Project for Global Workers' Rights and the Asian Studies Program.

Strategic Amnesia: Postcolonial Studies and the Second World

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 20, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM

Nancy Condee, Universty of Pittsburgh

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series. A streaming video of Nancy Condee's presentation is available through the C-NET archives.


The Ethics of Food Security

Food Ethics Series
Feb 13, 2012
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Bryan L. McDonald, Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society, Penn State 

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.


Parallel Lives: Bolìvar and the Classical Poetics of the Revolution

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 13, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Germán Campos-Munoz, Penn State 

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Literary History in the Posthistorical University: The Division of Francophone Studies

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 06, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Vincent Bruyere, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Finance, Food, and Force in U.S. Foreign Policy

Lecture on foreign policy
Feb 02, 2012
05:30 PM to 07:00 PM
Katz Auditorium

Stan Goff, Special Forces Veteran

Stan Goff has worked as a career soldier, an organizer, a consultant, and a writer. During his military career, he participated in and advised foreign militaries on counter-insurgency operations. He worked as a Parachute Infantryman, a Cavalry Scout, a Ranger Infantryman, a Delta Force counterterrorist “operator,” a Special Forces Medical Sergeant, and a Special Forces Operations and Intelligence Sergeant. He taught at both the Jungle Operations Training Center in Fort Sherman, Panama, and the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY.

He worked as a military affairs writer for Sanders Research Associates, and as the Military Editor for From The Wilderness Publications. He has written four books: Hideous Dream - A Soldier’s Memoir of the US Invasion of Haiti,Full Spectrum Disorder - The Military in the New American Century, Sex & War, and Energy War - Exterminism for the 21st Century. 

Narrative and Intellectual Disability

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Jan 30, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Michael Berube, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Campus Forum on the Middle East: ONE YEAR AFTER THE EGYPTIAN REVOLUTION

Panel Discussion
Jan 25, 2012
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
101 Chambers

Moderated by Christian Brady, Dean of the Schreyer Honors College

Panelists include:

James Piazza, Associate Professor of Political Science, PSU

Arthur Goldschmidt, Emeritus Professor of Middle Eastern History, PSU

Robert Vitalis, Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Steve Semmler, PSU student

This event is sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the Department of History, the Jewish Studies Program, the Presidential Leadership Academy, the Committee for Middle Eastern Studies, the School of International Affairs, and the Rock Ethics Institute at Penn State.

Pain in Fish: Should This Influence How We Handle and Harvest Them?

Food Ethics Series
Jan 23, 2012
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Victoria Braithwaite, Professor of Fisheries and Biology, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.


The Art of Stephen Colbert: Satire and Democracy

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Jan 23, 2012
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Sophia McClennen, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


World Stories Alive! Tales in Many Tongues

K-12 event
Jan 21, 2012
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library

This event is co-sponsored by the Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School, Global Connections, and Schlow Centre Region Library. See poster for additional details.

The Limits of Scientific Knowledge and the Ethics of Dietary Guidance

Food Ethics Series
Dec 05, 2011
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Gary Taubes, American science writer and frequent contributor to The New York Times 

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.


Bella Brodzki and Michael Levine, Editors CLS Special Issue

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Dec 05, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


China's Emerging Technological Trajectory: Challenges and Opportunities

Workshop on China
Dec 02, 2011
02:30 PM to 06:00 PM
Smeal Auditorium, Room 110 Business Building

Panel 1: 2:30 - 4:00pm

Panel 2: 4:15 - 6:00pm

The objective of this workshop is to develop a deeper, more profound understanding of the goals and intentions of the Chinese government regarding its strategy for promoting greater levels of indigenous innovation.

ROUNDTABLE: Comparing Comparisons

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Nov 28, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jonathan Eburne, Nergis Ertuk, Charlotte Eubanks 

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

College of Agricultural Sciences International Careers Panel

Career panel on the agricultural sciences
Nov 18, 2011
12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Foster Auditorium

Learn about international career opportunities within the field of agricultural sciences from the experts. Includes discussion about government, NGOs, industry, and academia in international careers, with a special focus on Food Security issues. General tips and resources about searching a position in your field will be covered as well.

This event is co-sponsored by The College of Agricultural SciencesThe School of International Affairs, and The University Libraries.

International Careers Panel

Panel on international career opportunities in agricultural science.
Nov 18, 2011
12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Foster Auditorium

Hosted by the College of Agricultural Sciences Office of International Programs, the Center for Global Studies, the School of International Affairs, and University Libraries.

Learn about international career opportunities within the field of Agricultural Sciences from the experts. Includes discussion about government, NGOs, industry, and academia in international careers, with a special focus on Food Security issues. General tips and resources about searching a position in your field will be covered as well. Panelists include: Panelists include:

  • Deanna Behring, Director of International Programs

    College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University

  • Chris MacGill, Associate Director, Programming & Education

    Credentials Services, Career Services, Penn State University

  • Andy Hirneisen, Associate Microbiology Research Specialist

    Quality and Regulatory Compliance, The Hershey Company

  • Lindsey Itle, Africa & Mid East Cochran Fellowship Program

    USDA/FAS/OCBD/TS

Milking the Rhino: Innovative Solutions Showcase

Showcase
Nov 16, 2011
06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
HUB Auditorium

Milking the Rhino: Documentary Screening

Documentary Screening
Nov 16, 2011
05:00 PM to 06:30 PM
HUB Auditorium

Milking the Rhino is a documentary that explores the complex relationships between people and wildlife in sub-Saharan Africa. It provides the context for students to develop appropriate, innovative and sustainable solutions to empower indigenous communities to leverage natural resources for self-determined development in Africa.


Home, Film Screening

Film screening
Nov 15, 2011
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Home is an educational film about the present state of the global environment featuring breathtaking photography by Yann Arthus-Bertrand. Held in conjunction with Penn State's International Education Week, the film screening is free and open to the public. A movie trailer can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/homeproject.

This film screening is co-sponsored by the University Librairies, the Center for Sustainability, the Rock Ethics Institute, the School of International Affairs, the Center for Global Studies, the College of Agricultural Sciences' Office of International Programs, and the United Nations Association of Centre Country.

Mourning the Queer: Black Memory and Queer Erasures

Sexualities Lecture Series
Nov 15, 2011
12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Matt Richardson, Assistant Professor of English and African and African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas at Austin 

This lecture is part of the Sexualities Lecture Series.


The Food Safety Modernization Act: Creating a Level Playing Field that Promotes Ethics in the Industry

Food Ethics Series
Nov 14, 2011
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Caroline Smith DeWaal, Director, Food Safety Program, Center for Science in the Public Interest 

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.


Transgender and Race

Sexualities Series and Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Nov 14, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Matt Richardson, Assistant Professor of English and African and African Diaspora Studies, University of Texas at Austin.

This lecture is part of both the Sexualities and Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Shailja Patel Poetry Reading with Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and

Sexualities Lecture Series
Nov 08, 2011
07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Gabeba Baderoon

A reading by the Kenyan poet and sexuality rights activist, Shailja Patel, Nairobi and Berkeley. This lecture is part of the Sexualities Lecture Series.


Water is Rising: Panel Discussion

Panel Discussion
Nov 07, 2011
07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Katz Auditorium

This event is being held the day before and in conjunction with the Center for Performing Arts production, Water is Rising. The panel, moderated by Dr. William Easterling, will include Jamison Colburn, Ann Clements, Donald Brown, and Judy Mitoma.

Water is Rising: Panel Discussion is a program of the Centre County UN Association.

Standing, Sitting and Sleeping: Unveiling the Politics of Sexuality in Africa

Sexualities Lecture Series
Nov 02, 2011
06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Nittany Lion Inn Assembly Room

Sylvia Tamale, Associate Professor of Law, Makerere University, Uganda, the annual Nelson Mandela Lecture of the Africana Research Center

This lecture is part of the Sexualities Lecture Series.


The Center for Global Studies Graduate Research Symposium

Research Symposium
Nov 02, 2011
06:00 PM to 07:30 PM
124 Sparks

The Center for Global Studies' first Graduate Research Symposium showcased the findings of the research abroad conducted by Penn State graduate students with the support of the Center. The disciplines represented range from adult education to visual art and ecology, connected by the focus on the global dynamics shaping each field.

Brief research presentations by:

Katharine Reed Allen, College of Communication

“Generation Y and Transnational Advocacy Network Model: Communicating Dissent from Cuba?”

Maureen Biermann, Department of Geography

“Funding Adaptation as Development: Tanzania’s Engagement with UN Policy”

Roberta Chapman, Department of Art History

“Paris of the South: Buenos Aires”

Ashlee Laura Dere, Department of Geosciences

“Shale Weathering Rates at the Plynlimon Forest, Wales”

Julianne Hagarty, Department of Geosciences

“Land Use, Water Quality, and Incidence of Buruli Ulcer in Gold-Mining Regions of Ghana”

Jessica Heckert, Program in Demography, Human Development, and Family Studies 

“Youth Migration and Youth Transitions: The Haitian Experience”

Andrei Israel , Department of Geography and Women’s Studies

“Learning in Places: Embodying and Situating Knowledge through Field-based Education”

K. P. Joo, College of Education

“Globalization, the Development of Korea National Open University, and Adults’ Learner Resistance”

Cassi Knight, Department of Geosciences

“Biogeography of Ancient Southern Rainforest Lineages”

Eric L. Welch, History, Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies

“The Recent Excavations at Tell es-Safi, Israel”

Berlin and the Anxious Disavowal of Beijing Modernism: Architectural Polemics within Globalization

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Oct 31, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Dan Purdy, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Turkish Night: 88th Anniversary of the Foundation of the Republic of Turkey

Cultural Event
Oct 28, 2011
06:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Heritage Hall, HUB

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for dinner (meal ticket purchase required)

Free after 8:15 p.m.

A Queer Agenda for 2012 and Beyond?

Sexualities Lecture Series
Oct 28, 2011
05:30 PM to 06:30 PM
Foster Auditorium

M. Jacqui Alexander, Research Professor of Women's Studies, Spelman College

This lecture is part of the Sexualities Lecture Series.

Tenth Annual Professional Development Conference on Academic Advising: Advising for the Global Community

Professional Development Conference
Oct 26, 2011
08:30 AM to 03:15 PM
The Penn Stater Conference Hotel

Wikileaks: One Year Later

Lecture simulcast on global politics and national security
Oct 25, 2011
05:00 PM to 06:00 PM
116 Katz Building

Philip J. Crowley, General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership 

This is a simulcast lecture from Carlisle, PA.

Philip J. Crowley will address the impact that WikiLeaks has had on global politics and the media and the implications for national security policies.

Crowley's research and teaching interests focus on national security policy, public diplomacy, and the impact of the global media environment on conflict, policy, and politics. The General Omar N. Bradley Chair is a collaboration among Penn State's School of International Affairs, Penn State Law, Dickinson College, and the U.S. Army War College.

Crowley frequently appears on major media outlets and is a contributor to Al Jazeera English, the BBC, and The Daily Beast. He can also be followed on Twitter @PJCrowley.

Personalized Nutrition: Ethical and Regulatory Aspects

Food Ethics Series
Oct 24, 2011
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Greg Sutliff Auditorium, Katz Building

David Castle, Chair of Innovation in the Life Sciences, ESRC Innogen Centre, University of Edinburgh

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.

David Lynch's Material Girls

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Oct 24, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Todd McGowan, University of Vermont  

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


A Tale of Four Hungers

Food Ethics Series
Oct 20, 2011
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Greg Sutliff Auditorium, Katz Building

Olivier De Schutter, Professor of Law, University of Louvain; Visiting Professor, Columbia University; and UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food

This lecture is part of the Food Ethics Series.


Curious Contradictions, Negotiating Encounters with Cuba

Panel Discussion
Oct 17, 2011
06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Dr. Alyssa Garcia

Dr. Alyssa Garcia and a panel of six students discuss their experiences during a 2 week embedded program in Havana, Cuba.

Why Were the New York Intellectuals Jewish?; or, The Secret Relationship Between the Neo-Cons and the Jews

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Oct 17, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Benjamin Schreier, Penn State

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Translation, Intertextuality, Interpretation

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Oct 10, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Lawrence Venuti, Temple University

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


The Classics as Public Sphere in Modernizing Europe and China

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Oct 03, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alex Beecroft, University of South Carolina

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


ACL(x)

Conference
Oct 01, 2011
01:45 PM to 05:30 PM
Hintz Family Alumni Center

Penn State will be hosting ACL(x), the experimental fall conference of the American Comparative Literature Association, September 30 – October 1.

The conference, devoted this year to the theme of E(x)change, will focus on new ways of exchanging and discussing academic work in the conference context. It will therefore feature talks with Twitter feedback, one danced performance, a session of five-minute papers, a debate, and several other innovations in academic format, each chosen in a spirit of experimentation and in the hope that it might prove duplicable.

The conference features a number of well-known scholars in literary studies, among them Frances Ferguson (Chicago), Haun Saussy (Chicago), David Damrosch (Harvard), Carlos Rojas (Duke), Jeffrey Schnapp (Harvard), Joey Slaughter (Columbia), Haiyan Lee (Stanford), Judith Roof (Rice), Madhumita Lahiri (Brown), and Jennifer Wenzel (Michigan), as well as talks by several of our Penn State colleagues. Most sessions will be held at the Atherton Hotel; Saturday afternoon sessions will occur at the Hintz Alumni Center.

Please visit the ACL(x) web site for more information and a detailed schedule of events and download the flyer.

Geographies of Justice: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

Symposium
Sep 30, 2011 03:30 PM to
Oct 01, 2011 05:30 PM
Walker Building

For a detailed schedule of events, please visit the Geographies of Justice website.

Sponsored by the Department of Geography, the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, and The Center for Global Studies.

Geographies of Justice: An Interdisciplinary Symposium

Symposium
Sep 30, 2011
02:00 PM to 03:30 PM
213 Buckhout

For a detailed schedule of events, please visit the Geographies of Justice website.

Sponsored by the Department of Geography, the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, and The Center for Global Studies

ACL(x)

Conference
Sep 30, 2011 09:00 AM to
Oct 01, 2011 12:15 PM
Atherton Hotel

Penn State will be hosting ACL(x), the experimental fall conference of the American Comparative Literature Association, September 30 – October 1.

The conference, devoted this year to the theme of E(x)change, will focus on new ways of exchanging and discussing academic work in the conference context. It will therefore feature talks with Twitter feedback, one danced performance, a session of five-minute papers, a debate, and several other innovations in academic format, each chosen in a spirit of experimentation and in the hope that it might prove duplicable.

The conference features a number of well-known scholars in literary studies, among them Frances Ferguson (Chicago), Haun Saussy (Chicago), David Damrosch (Harvard), Carlos Rojas (Duke), Jeffrey Schnapp (Harvard), Joey Slaughter (Columbia), Haiyan Lee (Stanford), Judith Roof (Rice), Madhumita Lahiri (Brown), and Jennifer Wenzel (Michigan), as well as talks by several of our Penn State colleagues. Most sessions will be held at the Atherton Hotel; Saturday afternoon sessions will occur at the Hintz Alumni Center.

Please visit the ACL(x) web site for more information and a detailed schedule of events and download the flyer.

"Si-militude", or How the Early Chinese Out-Platoed Plato

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Sep 26, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Martin Ekstrom, Södertörn University, Stockholm

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

  

The Right to Look and the Crisis of Visuality

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Sep 19, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Nicholas Mirzoeff, New York University

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.


Against Periodization

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Sep 12, 2011
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Eric Hayot, Penn State

This lecture was part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

 

What Makes Food Good? The Terrain of Food Ethics and the Agrarian Tradition

Food Ethics Series
Aug 29, 2011
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Paul B. Thompson, W.K. Kellogg Professor of Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics, Michigan State University

A webcast of Dr. Thompson's lecture What Makes Food Good? The Terrain of Food Ethics and the Agrarian Tradition is available at Mediasite. This lecture was a part of the Food Ethics Series.


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