2017 - 2018

ISIS, Jihad, and Islamic law

Aug 23, 2017
07:00 PM to 08:30 PM
Foster Auditorium (Pattee Library)

Dr. Mohammad Khalil, Michigan State University

How does ISIS attempt to justify its acts of terrorism? In this lecture, Mohammad Khalil (associate professor of Religious Studies, adjunct professor of Law, and Director of the Muslim Studies Program at Michigan State University) discusses some of the traditional rules of armed jihad according to Islamic law, shows how the leadership of ISIS attempts to present their acts of terrorism as being in line with those rules, and examines mainstream Muslim scholarly responses to ISIS.

This lecture, hosted by Penn State's History Department, is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

2017 Penn State Marathon Read: First Books

Sep 07, 2017 12:00 PM to
Sep 08, 2017 12:00 PM
Lawn in front of Pattee/Paterno Library

During this annual event, volunteers take turns reading over a 24-hour period. This year's event, First Booksfocuses on author's first books that they published, or their first book in a series, by authors from all around the world. Each title will be available in English and the original language in which it was published.

Anyone may volunteer for two to five minutes of reading. Groups -- classes, teams, social organizations -- are encouraged to participate by volunteering for larger blocks of time. There will be pizza, t-shirts, and other surprises. 

For questions, or to sign up to read in advance in English, Spanish, French, Japanese, German, Chinese, Portuguese or Russian, please email .

 

The 2017 book list includes:

Catcher in the Rye,  JD Salinger

Black Swan,  Lyriae Van Clief-Stefanon

Ready Player One,  Ernest Cline

Black Heralds,  Cesar Vallejo

Love in a Fallen City,  Eileen Chang

Fearful Symmetries: What Does Equivalence Mean in War and in Literature

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Sep 11, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Lital Levy, Princeton University

Lital Levy is Associate Professor for Comparative Literature at Princeton University, where she teaches Hebrew and Arabic literatures, Jewish studies, and literary theory. She obtained her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley and was previously a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. She specializes in contact zones of modern Hebrew and Arabic. Her research encompasses literature and film from Israel/Palestine, the 19th and 20th century intellectual history of Arab Jews, the interface of Jewish literature and world literature, and the comparative study of non-Western literary modernities. Her award-winning 2014 book Poetic Trespass: Writing between Hebrew and Arabic in Israel/Palestine examines multilingualism, translation, and language politics in the literature and culture of Israel/Palestine. She is currently working on two book projects: an intellectual history of Arab Jews in the modern Arabic and Hebrew renaissance movements, and a study of spatiality and temporality in literature of the conflict.

Translating Sub-Saharan African Classics

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Sep 18, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Antjie Krog, University of the Western Cape

Connecting Cultures

Penn State Reads Public Lecture
Sep 18, 2017
04:00 PM to 06:00 PM
233AB HUB-Robeson Center

Mark Evans, Executive Director of Outward Bound Oman, fellow of The Explorers Club

Mark Evans, a wilderness explorer with a passion for bridging cross-cultural differences in the Middle East, will deliver public lectures on September 18th and 19th, as part of the Penn State Reads Program.  On Monday, September 18th, he will discuss his work with "Connecting Cultures," a program he founded in 2004, after his realization that his experiences of living in the Middle East and the way in which the Middle East was portrayed in the media were inconsistent. "Connecting Cultures" brings together aspiring leaders from the Middle East and Europe for desert excursions.  Mark uses the desert as a classroom to promote greater cultural understanding between young people from the western and Arab world.

Pete Allison, associate professor of values and experiential learning, will moderate a conversation with Evans.   

Penn State Reads provides a shared experience among new students, encouraging intellectual engagement within and beyond the classroom, stimulating critical thinking, and fostering a deeper connection to Penn State's mission and core values.

Evans' visit is co-sponsored by Penn State Reads, the Student Engagement Network; the Center for Global Studies; the College of Health and Human Development and its Office of Diversity and Inclusion; University Libraries; Shaver's Creek; the Rock Ethics Institute; and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management.

Into the Abode of Death

Penn State Reads Public Lecture
Sep 19, 2017
04:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Mark Evans, Executive Director of Outward Bound Oman, fellow of the Explorers Club

Mark Evans, a wilderness explorer with a passion for bridging cross-cultural differences in the Middle East will lead this public lecture at Foster Auditorium, as part of the Penn State Reads Program.  This lecture will feature an introduction to Oman from Kathleen Ridolfo, the executive director of the Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center in Washington, D.C.  A livestream link will be available for all Penn State students on the Penn state Reads website a week before the event.

Penn State Reads provides a shared experience among new students, encouraging intellectual engagement within and beyond the classroom, stimulating critical thinking, and fostering a deeper connection to Penn State's mission and core values.

Evans' visit is co-sponsored by Penn State Reads, the Student Engagement Network; the Center for Global Studies; the College of Health and Human Development and its Office of Diversity and Inclusion; University Libraries; Shaver's Creek; the Rock Ethics Institute; and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management.

Sexuality, Disability, and Aging: Queer Temporalities of the Phallus

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Sep 25, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jane Gallop, University of Wisconsin

Captain Abu Raed (2014)

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Sep 27, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

An airport janitor who finds a pilot's hat discovers his calling as he forms a friendship with a group of poor children who are persuaded that he is a true airline pilot.

Avant-gardism Against Itself: 'Conversation' and the Reader Critic in the Little Review

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 02, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alan Golding, University of Louisville

Bunce Island: A Ghost Town of the Atlantic Slave Trade

African Studies Seminar
Oct 04, 2017
12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
216 Willard Building

Professor Joseph Opala

Professor Joseph Opala has done research for more than 40 years on Bunce Island, an 18th century British slave castle in Sierra Leone.  Unlike other slave castles in West Africa, Bunce Island has a strong historical link to the United States.  It is also far more isolated than most castles, and when he began his research in 1976, very few foreign visitors went there, and the local people believed that a dangerous spirit occupied the island, and were terrified to go there.  Opala will explain his research on Bunce Island’s history, oral history, and archaeology.  He will also explain his public history initiatives that helped bring this remarkable site to popular attention in both Sierra Leone and the United States.

A Global Competence Curriculum Framework

Workshop
Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE Pre-Conference Workshop

Join us in vetting PACIE’s newly drafted Curriculum Framework and assist with populating the Standards Aligned System (SAS) portal with valuable global competence resources. The Curriculum Framework is designed to identify the long term transfer goals, big ideas, and essential questions to frame instruction across the curriculum. Providing resources in SAS will assist educators in integrating global competence into their respective classrooms. This workshop will be highly interactive, and attendees will be expected to provide critical feedback on the framework and submit resources for integration into the SAS portal. Workshop registration is free. Simply select this workshop when you register online for the PACIE annual conference.

More information about this event…

Overview of the Standards of Good Practice

Workshop
Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE Pre-Conference Workshop

Facilitator: Brian Brubaker, Pennsylvania State University 

The Forum on Education Abroad’s Standards provide a means to assess and ensure quality in all areas of education abroad programming—academic programming, student conduct, resources and personnel and policies and procedures. Using the Standards as a guide, participants will examine practices at their universities or organizations. This workshop will be highly interactive, drawing on case studies and issues of interest to participants. Registration for this workshop is separate from your PACIE Conference registration. Register for the pre-conference workshop on the Forum's website here.

More information about this event…

New Media in India: From Fad to Fundamental?

Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 02:30 PM
Foster Auditorium (Pattee)

Dr. Sunetra Sen Narayan, Indian Institute of Mass Communication

Dr. Shalini Narayanan, Independent Communications Consultant

New media is shaping the public discourse in India today. What are the implications of this for the world's largest democracy? And for development? Who is getting left out of the new media equation? Given the sheer numbers and diversity of India, how do we go about regulating it? This study aims to map the changing contours of India's fascinating new mediascape.

Sunetra Sen Narayan has over 25 years’ experience related to communications, spanning advertising, print journalism, documentary film production and teaching.  She has been educated at Delhi University where she studied economics and Pennsylvania State University where she earned her Masters in Telecommunications studies and her Doctorate in Mass Communication. 

She is currently Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi. She has over 15 years teaching experience. She has been the editor of the academic journal, Communicator, India’s oldest scholarly communication journal. Prior to this she has been a print journalist, writing on business and travel in India. She has authored the book: Globalization and Television, a Study of the Indian Experience 1990-2010, Oxford University Press (2014).  And more recently, co-edited India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media (Sage, 2016). 

Shalini Narayanan, D.Phil., is an independent Communications Consultant with over two and a half decades of experience in the government and non-government sectors. She was part of the Indian civil service for 23 years, before taking voluntary retirement in 2013. During that time, she worked at the news division of the public broadcaster, Prasar Bharati, both in television and radio, for over a decade. She also worked at DAVP, the Central government’s advertising agency and as Editor of the only government-run newspaper for jobs, Employment News. As Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi, she headed two departments and conducted research. Post-retirement, she has contributed to Non-Government Organisations in diverse fields such as digital financial inclusion, substance abuse and mental health. 

Her co-edited book India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media was published by Sage Publications in September, 2016.

The Ancestors Return: Three Gullah Homecomings to Sierra Leone

Lecture
Oct 05, 2017
06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Professor Joseph Opala

The Gullah people of coastal South Carolina and Georgia have retained more African cultural heritage than any other black community in the U.S.  Professor Joseph Opala has shown that many of the Gullahs’ ancestors were brought from Sierra Leone, and over the past 30 years he has organized three “Gullah Homecomings” to Sierra Leone, each involving Gullah people with provable connections to that country.  Opala will describe the historical links that led to these homecomings, and the responses of Gullahs and Sierra Leoneans as they confronted their common heritage.  He argues that “homecomings” of this sort can be valuable research tools for uncovering information on the African diaspora.

Professor Opala's visit is sponsored by the PSU African Studies Program, and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

"Capitol"izing on Languages and Global Education

Conference
Oct 06, 2017 07:30 AM to
Oct 07, 2017 04:15 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE & PSMLA Joint Conference 2017

PACIE, the Pennsylvania Council for International Education, is proud to co-sponsor its 2017 conference with the Pennsylvania State Modern Language Association, a non-profit professional organization dedicated to the teaching and learning of languages and cultures from kindergarten through university levels. If you are a member of PACIE and a K-12 teacher, please note that PSMLA is able to grant ACT 48 credits. If you take advantage of the PSMLA/PACIE Conference Membership discount prior to or at the beginning of the conference, you will be able to gain membership to PSMLA for $10 and earn ACT 48 credits for the training you receive at the conference.

This year’s theme embodies a significant part of PACIE’s and PSMLA's own missions— to build and strengthen connections and collaborations among educational institutions, governmental bodies, businesses, and non-profit organizations throughout Pennsylvania.

Visit the Registration Page now to complete your conference registration. 


More information about this event…

America's Relations with Russia in the Age of Putin

Oct 13, 2017
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Sutliff Auditorium, Lewis Katz Building (UP)

Thomas R. Pickering, retired United States Ambassador to Russia, India, Jordan, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria and the United Nations

Ambassador Pickering will bring his immense expertise to bear on this complex and highly relevant topic, having served as the U.S. ambassador to Russia from 1993 to 1996, and will discuss the intricacies and challenges of the United States’ relationship with Russia at a time when purported Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and tensions over Russia’s response to North Korean aggression are making headlines around the world.

Pickering’s tenure as a Foreign Service officer included ambassadorships to El Salvador, India, Israel, Jordan, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Nations over the course of four decades. He also served as the undersecretary of state for political affairs from 1997 to 2000, and holds the rank career ambassador—the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service.

Ambassador Pickering's visit is sponsored by the School of International Affairs, and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

“Infrastructures of Water and Visuality: Thinking with Sleep Dealer and Arido Movie”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 16, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Adriana Johnson, University of California, Irvine

Chinese Religious Citizenship: A Comparative Study of Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian Religious academies in Republican China

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Oct 18, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Bin Chen, Penn State

Bin Chen's talk seeks to present Chinese the main argument of his dissertation. In twentieth-century China, Republican regimes and ruling elites largely excluded religion from their visions of modern China. The state and elites considered citizens of Republican China as a group of “new people” who were fully committed to modernity and free from “backward” superstitions or belief. However, the concept of citizenship was open to debate. While the state and elites did not include religion in their visions of modern citizens, the religious institutions responded through religious academies. In these academies, religious institutions constructed religious citizenship. They nurtured a new group of students who unquestionably defined themselves as members of modern China yet their markers of citizenship were inevitably connected to religion.

Different religious academies constructed religious citizenship differently. Buddhist academies were firmly adherent to the political rhetoric of Republican regimes. Buddhism academies and their students presented themselves as preservers of essential Chinese culture. They argued that Republican regimes should patronize Buddhism and Buddhism was useful for nation-building, including nurturing “citizens.” The Islamic academies, in particular, the Chengda Teachers’ Academy, incorporated citizenship with Islamic religious practices. They argued that to be a good citizen was crucial for a Hui to be a good Muslim. Christian academies, like the Suzhou Yates Academy, presented the Christian education as the ideal education for citizens. Students who graduated from Yates might not be converts, but their understandings of citizenship were deeply influenced by Christian civic ethics: good citizens should break away from China’s superstitious past, arm themselves with scientific knowledge, and actively engage in sports and public affairs.

Bin Chen is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the Penn State University. He is currently working on a dissertation that compares Islamic, Buddhist, and Christian religious academies and their interactions with the broader society. The dissertation seeks to alter our understanding of China’s modernization, arguing that the modernization process in modern China was inextricably linked with religious institutions.

“Family and its discontent in early Chinese thought”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 23, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Tao Jiang, Rutgers University

FLAS information session

Information session
Oct 24, 2017
04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
308 Boucke

The Center for Global Studies is pleased to announce the competition for FLAS Fellowships for the Pennsylvania State University. FLAS Fellowships are authorized under Title VI of the Higher Education Act and are administered by the U.S. Department of Education. They assist undergraduate and graduate students in achieving competency in selected foreign languages and conducting research in related international and area studies. Learn more about this exciting opportunity by coming to our informational session and by visiting our FLAS page. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.

Echoes of 20th Century Fascism in Modern Politics and Culture

Panel Discussion
Oct 24, 2017
06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
109 Walker

Bringing together faculty and graduate students from both the Political Science and History departments, "Echoes of 20th Century Fascism" provides a platform to discuss varying perspectives on a complex and pertinent topic: the history of Fascist thought in the United States and globally and how this relates to the current political climate.  This event seeks to bring together faculty and students - university-wide as well as the general public to discuss the importance of using history to understand recent events. 

Arabic Film Screening

CGS Arabic Film Series
Oct 24, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

“When Species Meet: A Comparative Reading of Wolf Totem and Disgrace”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 30, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Hansong Dan, Nanjing University

Race in the Americas 2017 Conference

Conference
Nov 03, 2017 12:00 PM to
Nov 04, 2017 04:30 PM
102 Oak Building

Keynote speaker: Micol Seigel, Indiana University, Bloomington

The Race in the America Conference (RITA) at Penn State is a forum for future academics, professionals, and activists engaged in the study of racial paradigms in the Americas. With a history of participants from around the country, RITA seeks to bring together scholars dedicated to the study of the Hemispheric Americas from all disciplines and diverse occupational endeavors.

RITA’s mission is to foster intellectual discussion, research, and teaching on race, displacement, and immigration in Latin America, the Caribbean, and other geographies throughout the Americas; to promote the interests of its diverse participants; and to encourage civic engagement through network building and public debate on political and racial issues in the Hemispheric American context. RITA hopes to foster meaningful engagement with the economic, social, and political conditions of racialized subjects throughout the region, and build a vibrant community of inquiry and innovation at each meeting. The title for the 2017 Conference is "Space/Place/Race: Geography and Power in the Americas". 

The Joke is Mightier than the Sword

Lecture followed by signing of Youssef's Revolution for Dummies
Nov 03, 2017
04:30 PM to 06:30 PM
Nittany Lion Inn, University Park

Bassem Youssef, dubbed the Jon Stewart of the Arab World, was the host of the popular TV show Al-Bernameg which was the first of its kind, political satire show in the Middle East. Originally a 5-minute show on YouTube, Al-Bernameg became the first online to TV conversion in the Middle East and the most watched show across the region with 30 million viewers every week.

Throughout its three seasons, Al-Bernameg remained controversial through its humorous yet bold criticism of the ruling powers, which led to tens of lawsuits being filed against the show and its host. Youssef was even issued an arrest warrant in March 2013 for being "anti-Islam" and for insulting the President.  In recognition of his success, Youssef was named among the Time Magazine most influential list for 2013 - under the “Pioneers” category, was awarded the International Press Freedom Award by the CPJ, and was chosen by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the leading global thinkers during the same year.

Youssef’s most recent projects include Democracy Handbook; a ten-part series exploring topics of democracy on fusion.net, the launch of his new book, Revolution for Dummies:  Laughing Through the Arab Spring in March 2017 and the release of Tickling Giants, a documentary film about Bassem Youssef directed by Sara Taksler, in April 2016.

Youssef majored in cardiothoracic surgery, passed the United States Medical License Exam (USMLE) and is a member of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS).  

This event will be followed by a signing of Youssef's Revolution for Dummies. Youssef's visit is co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, Africana Research Center, African Studies Program, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Sociology, Egyptian Student Association, McCourtney Institute for Democracy, Migration Studies Project, Paterno Fellows Program, Rock Ethics Institute, School of International Affairs, and Schreyer Honors College.

Film screening of Tickling Giants followed by discussion

film screening, panel discussion, book signing, reception
Nov 04, 2017
05:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Katz Auditorium and Atrium, University Park

In the midst of the Egyptian Arab Spring, Bassem Youssef makes a decision that’s every mother’s worst nightmare... He leaves his job as a heart surgeon to become a full-time comedian.

Dubbed, “The Egyptian Jon Stewart,” Bassem creates the satirical show, Al-Bernameg. The weekly program quickly becomes the most viewed television program in the Middle East, with 30 million viewers per episode. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart averaged two million viewers.

In a country where free speech is not settled law, Bassem’s show becomes as controversial as it popular. He and his staff must endure physical threats, protests, and legal action, all because of jokes. As Bassem attempts to remain on the air, keep his staff safe, and not get arrested, he continues to hold those in power accountable. Despite increasing danger, the team at Al-Bernameg employs comedy, not violence, to comment on hypocrisy in media, politics, and religion.

Tickling Giants follows the team of Al-Bernameg as they discover democracy is not easily won. The young women and men working on Bassem’s show are fearless revolutionaries, who just happen to be really, really funny.

Bassem Youssef, dubbed the Jon Stewart of the Arab World, was the host of the popular TV show Al-Bernameg - which was the first of its kind, political satire show in the Middle East. Originally a 5-minute show on YouTube, Al-Bernameg became the first online to TV conversion in the Middle East and the most watched show across the region with 30 million viewers every week.

Throughout its three seasons, Al-Bernameg remained controversial through its humorous yet bold criticism of the ruling powers, which led to tens of lawsuits being filed against the show and its host. Youssef was even issued an arrest warrant in March 2013 for being "anti-Islam" and for insulting the President.  In recognition of his success, Youssef was named among the Time Magazine most influential list for 2013 (under the “Pioneers” category), was awarded the International Press Freedom Award by the CPJ, and was chosen by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the leading global thinkers during the same year.

A senior producer at The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Sara Taksler has pitched stories and jokes, and researched footage for over a decade. Taksler’s first film, Stop the Ignorance: The Beauty That Is New Jersey, was a tribute to her home state. Her latest documentary, Tickling Giants, had its world premiere at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival.

Youssef's visit is co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, Africana Research Center, African Studies Program, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Sociology, Egyptian Student Association, McCourtney Institute for Democracy, Migration Studies Project, Paterno Fellows Program, Rock Ethics Institute, School of International Affairs, and Schreyer Honors College.

TICKLING GIANTS
Presented by Sarkasmos Productions LLC in association with Technicolor
Directed, Produced, Written and Executive Produced by Sara Taksler
Produced by: Frederic Rose, Maziar Bahari and Monica Hampton
Executive Producers: Technicolor and Hassan Elmasry
Starring: Bassem Youssef, Jon Stewart, Andeel, Miral El Desoki, Tarek AIQazzaz and Hend Radwan

Title TBD

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Nov 06, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

N. Katherine Hayles, Duke University

Photography and Migration in Interwar Senegal and France

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 08, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Johann Le Guelte, Penn State

Photography was a central tool of the French colonial bureaucracy. Following World War I and the massive deployment of Senegalese soldiers (tirailleurs sénégalais) to the French metropole, authorities implemented various strategies to control the movements of colonial subjects. In this talk, I will explore the politics of administrative photography (identification cards, livrets, passports etc.) in interwar Senegal and France, and its effects on intercolonial migrations. My archival research conducted in both Senegal and France and funded by CGS demonstrates that the empire relied on photography to act as a deterrent to migration. However, colonial subjects used photography in alternative ways in order to bypass and subvert new administrative restrictions.

Johann Le Guelte is a fifth-year doctoral Candidate in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at Penn State. His dissertation, Uncovering the Colonial Lens: Creation and Subversion of the French Visual Empire, explores how France, during the 1920s and 1930s, developed a visual empire as part of its colonial apparatus. During these years, the colonial state was involved to an unprecedented extent in the production and dissemination of colonial photographs, thereby fixing the stereotypical representation of the colonial other. In turn, however, he looks at photographers in French West Africa who created spaces of photographic "resistance" (a different esthétique de soi). By focusing on one colony – Senegal – he shows how the appropriation by locals of image-production created a visual counter-discourse, inviting the bodies of those under colonial rule to overturn the Western state’s perpetuation of a constructed colonial “savagery.

The Causal Architecture in Naturally Acquired German by Adult Korean Native Speakers

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 15, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Hyoun-A Joo, Penn State

In this lecture, Hyoun-A is presenting her dissertation research where she is asking how the German syntactic structure found representation in the minds of Korean immigrants in Germany. In the 70s, many Koreans moved to Germany for work purposes and they acquired German predominantly naturally by living and working in Germany rather than through formal instruction. Today, after more than 40 years, this population’s L2 German acquisition has reached a stable state and they developed into very different levels of proficiency. This presents a favorable situation to investigate the syntactic structure of German as it may have taken different forms in the minds of natural L2 acquirers. By pursuing this research, Hyoun-A aims to evaluate theories about the development of the German syntactic structure with insights from a matured clausal architecture, thereby advancing our understanding of how languages are acquired.

Hyoun-A is a graduate student in the German Department pursuing a dual degree in German Applied Linguistics and Language Science. Her current research interests involve second language acquisition and maintenance, as well as syntax. Having grown up within two languages and cultures, Hyoun-A developed a natural interest for bi-/multilingualism, which led her to work in Berlin, Seoul, and now Penn State. Her life and work experience in three different countries crucially shaped her sensitivity for ‘global citizenship’ that she also integrates into her research.

Return to Top