2017 - 2018

ISIS, Jihad, and Islamic law

Aug 23, 2017
07:00 PM to 08:30 PM
Foster Auditorium (Pattee Library)

Dr. Mohammad Khalil, Michigan State University

How does ISIS attempt to justify its acts of terrorism? In this lecture, Mohammad Khalil (associate professor of Religious Studies, adjunct professor of Law, and Director of the Muslim Studies Program at Michigan State University) discusses some of the traditional rules of armed jihad according to Islamic law, shows how the leadership of ISIS attempts to present their acts of terrorism as being in line with those rules, and examines mainstream Muslim scholarly responses to ISIS.

This lecture, hosted by Penn State's History Department, is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

2017 Penn State Marathon Read: First Books

Sep 07, 2017 12:00 PM to
Sep 08, 2017 12:00 PM
Lawn in front of Pattee/Paterno Library

During this annual event, volunteers take turns reading over a 24-hour period. This year's event, First Booksfocuses on author's first books that they published, or their first book in a series, by authors from all around the world. Each title will be available in English and the original language in which it was published.

Anyone may volunteer for two to five minutes of reading. Groups -- classes, teams, social organizations -- are encouraged to participate by volunteering for larger blocks of time. There will be pizza, t-shirts, and other surprises. 

For questions, or to sign up to read in advance in English, Spanish, French, Japanese, German, Chinese, Portuguese or Russian, please email .

 

The 2017 book list includes:

Catcher in the Rye,  JD Salinger

Black Swan,  Lyriae Van Clief-Stefanon

Ready Player One,  Ernest Cline

Black Heralds,  Cesar Vallejo

Love in a Fallen City,  Eileen Chang

Fearful Symmetries: What Does Equivalence Mean in War and in Literature

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Sep 11, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Lital Levy, Princeton University

Lital Levy is Associate Professor for Comparative Literature at Princeton University, where she teaches Hebrew and Arabic literatures, Jewish studies, and literary theory. She obtained her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley and was previously a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows. She specializes in contact zones of modern Hebrew and Arabic. Her research encompasses literature and film from Israel/Palestine, the 19th and 20th century intellectual history of Arab Jews, the interface of Jewish literature and world literature, and the comparative study of non-Western literary modernities. Her award-winning 2014 book Poetic Trespass: Writing between Hebrew and Arabic in Israel/Palestine examines multilingualism, translation, and language politics in the literature and culture of Israel/Palestine. She is currently working on two book projects: an intellectual history of Arab Jews in the modern Arabic and Hebrew renaissance movements, and a study of spatiality and temporality in literature of the conflict.

Translating Sub-Saharan African Classics

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Sep 18, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Antjie Krog, University of the Western Cape

Connecting Cultures

Penn State Reads Public Lecture
Sep 18, 2017
04:00 PM to 06:00 PM
233AB HUB-Robeson Center

Mark Evans, Executive Director of Outward Bound Oman, fellow of The Explorers Club

Mark Evans, a wilderness explorer with a passion for bridging cross-cultural differences in the Middle East, will deliver public lectures on September 18th and 19th, as part of the Penn State Reads Program.  On Monday, September 18th, he will discuss his work with "Connecting Cultures," a program he founded in 2004, after his realization that his experiences of living in the Middle East and the way in which the Middle East was portrayed in the media were inconsistent. "Connecting Cultures" brings together aspiring leaders from the Middle East and Europe for desert excursions.  Mark uses the desert as a classroom to promote greater cultural understanding between young people from the western and Arab world.

Pete Allison, associate professor of values and experiential learning, will moderate a conversation with Evans.   

Penn State Reads provides a shared experience among new students, encouraging intellectual engagement within and beyond the classroom, stimulating critical thinking, and fostering a deeper connection to Penn State's mission and core values.

Evans' visit is co-sponsored by Penn State Reads, the Student Engagement Network; the Center for Global Studies; the College of Health and Human Development and its Office of Diversity and Inclusion; University Libraries; Shaver's Creek; the Rock Ethics Institute; and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management.

Into the Abode of Death

Penn State Reads Public Lecture
Sep 19, 2017
04:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Mark Evans, Executive Director of Outward Bound Oman, fellow of the Explorers Club

Mark Evans, a wilderness explorer with a passion for bridging cross-cultural differences in the Middle East will lead this public lecture at Foster Auditorium, as part of the Penn State Reads Program.  This lecture will feature an introduction to Oman from Kathleen Ridolfo, the executive director of the Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center in Washington, D.C.  A livestream link will be available for all Penn State students on the Penn state Reads website a week before the event.

Penn State Reads provides a shared experience among new students, encouraging intellectual engagement within and beyond the classroom, stimulating critical thinking, and fostering a deeper connection to Penn State's mission and core values.

Evans' visit is co-sponsored by Penn State Reads, the Student Engagement Network; the Center for Global Studies; the College of Health and Human Development and its Office of Diversity and Inclusion; University Libraries; Shaver's Creek; the Rock Ethics Institute; and Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management.

Sexuality, Disability, and Aging: Queer Temporalities of the Phallus

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Sep 25, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jane Gallop, University of Wisconsin

Captain Abu Raed (2014)

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Sep 27, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

An airport janitor who finds a pilot's hat discovers his calling as he forms a friendship with a group of poor children who are persuaded that he is a true airline pilot.

Avant-gardism Against Itself: 'Conversation' and the Reader Critic in the Little Review

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 02, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alan Golding, University of Louisville

Bunce Island: A Ghost Town of the Atlantic Slave Trade

African Studies Seminar
Oct 04, 2017
12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
216 Willard Building

Professor Joseph Opala

Professor Joseph Opala has done research for more than 40 years on Bunce Island, an 18th century British slave castle in Sierra Leone.  Unlike other slave castles in West Africa, Bunce Island has a strong historical link to the United States.  It is also far more isolated than most castles, and when he began his research in 1976, very few foreign visitors went there, and the local people believed that a dangerous spirit occupied the island, and were terrified to go there.  Opala will explain his research on Bunce Island’s history, oral history, and archaeology.  He will also explain his public history initiatives that helped bring this remarkable site to popular attention in both Sierra Leone and the United States.

A Global Competence Curriculum Framework

Workshop
Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE Pre-Conference Workshop

Join us in vetting PACIE’s newly drafted Curriculum Framework and assist with populating the Standards Aligned System (SAS) portal with valuable global competence resources. The Curriculum Framework is designed to identify the long term transfer goals, big ideas, and essential questions to frame instruction across the curriculum. Providing resources in SAS will assist educators in integrating global competence into their respective classrooms. This workshop will be highly interactive, and attendees will be expected to provide critical feedback on the framework and submit resources for integration into the SAS portal. Workshop registration is free. Simply select this workshop when you register online for the PACIE annual conference.

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Overview of the Standards of Good Practice

Workshop
Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE Pre-Conference Workshop

Facilitator: Brian Brubaker, Pennsylvania State University 

The Forum on Education Abroad’s Standards provide a means to assess and ensure quality in all areas of education abroad programming—academic programming, student conduct, resources and personnel and policies and procedures. Using the Standards as a guide, participants will examine practices at their universities or organizations. This workshop will be highly interactive, drawing on case studies and issues of interest to participants. Registration for this workshop is separate from your PACIE Conference registration. Register for the pre-conference workshop on the Forum's website here.

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New Media in India: From Fad to Fundamental?

Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 02:30 PM
Foster Auditorium (Pattee)

Dr. Sunetra Sen Narayan, Indian Institute of Mass Communication

Dr. Shalini Narayanan, Independent Communications Consultant

New media is shaping the public discourse in India today. What are the implications of this for the world's largest democracy? And for development? Who is getting left out of the new media equation? Given the sheer numbers and diversity of India, how do we go about regulating it? This study aims to map the changing contours of India's fascinating new mediascape.

Sunetra Sen Narayan has over 25 years’ experience related to communications, spanning advertising, print journalism, documentary film production and teaching.  She has been educated at Delhi University where she studied economics and Pennsylvania State University where she earned her Masters in Telecommunications studies and her Doctorate in Mass Communication. 

She is currently Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi. She has over 15 years teaching experience. She has been the editor of the academic journal, Communicator, India’s oldest scholarly communication journal. Prior to this she has been a print journalist, writing on business and travel in India. She has authored the book: Globalization and Television, a Study of the Indian Experience 1990-2010, Oxford University Press (2014).  And more recently, co-edited India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media (Sage, 2016). 

Shalini Narayanan, D.Phil., is an independent Communications Consultant with over two and a half decades of experience in the government and non-government sectors. She was part of the Indian civil service for 23 years, before taking voluntary retirement in 2013. During that time, she worked at the news division of the public broadcaster, Prasar Bharati, both in television and radio, for over a decade. She also worked at DAVP, the Central government’s advertising agency and as Editor of the only government-run newspaper for jobs, Employment News. As Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi, she headed two departments and conducted research. Post-retirement, she has contributed to Non-Government Organisations in diverse fields such as digital financial inclusion, substance abuse and mental health. 

Her co-edited book India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media was published by Sage Publications in September, 2016.

The Ancestors Return: Three Gullah Homecomings to Sierra Leone

Lecture
Oct 05, 2017
06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Professor Joseph Opala

The Gullah people of coastal South Carolina and Georgia have retained more African cultural heritage than any other black community in the U.S.  Professor Joseph Opala has shown that many of the Gullahs’ ancestors were brought from Sierra Leone, and over the past 30 years he has organized three “Gullah Homecomings” to Sierra Leone, each involving Gullah people with provable connections to that country.  Opala will describe the historical links that led to these homecomings, and the responses of Gullahs and Sierra Leoneans as they confronted their common heritage.  He argues that “homecomings” of this sort can be valuable research tools for uncovering information on the African diaspora.

Professor Opala's visit is sponsored by the PSU African Studies Program, and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

"Capitol"izing on Languages and Global Education

Conference
Oct 06, 2017 07:30 AM to
Oct 07, 2017 04:15 PM
Holiday Inn Harrisburg-Hershey

PACIE & PSMLA Joint Conference 2017

PACIE, the Pennsylvania Council for International Education, is proud to co-sponsor its 2017 conference with the Pennsylvania State Modern Language Association, a non-profit professional organization dedicated to the teaching and learning of languages and cultures from kindergarten through university levels. If you are a member of PACIE and a K-12 teacher, please note that PSMLA is able to grant ACT 48 credits. If you take advantage of the PSMLA/PACIE Conference Membership discount prior to or at the beginning of the conference, you will be able to gain membership to PSMLA for $10 and earn ACT 48 credits for the training you receive at the conference.

This year’s theme embodies a significant part of PACIE’s and PSMLA's own missions— to build and strengthen connections and collaborations among educational institutions, governmental bodies, businesses, and non-profit organizations throughout Pennsylvania.

Visit the Registration Page now to complete your conference registration. 


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America's Relations with Russia in the Age of Putin

Oct 13, 2017
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
Sutliff Auditorium, Lewis Katz Building (UP)

Thomas R. Pickering, retired United States Ambassador to Russia, India, Jordan, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria and the United Nations

Ambassador Pickering will bring his immense expertise to bear on this complex and highly relevant topic, having served as the U.S. ambassador to Russia from 1993 to 1996, and will discuss the intricacies and challenges of the United States’ relationship with Russia at a time when purported Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and tensions over Russia’s response to North Korean aggression are making headlines around the world.

Pickering’s tenure as a Foreign Service officer included ambassadorships to El Salvador, India, Israel, Jordan, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Nations over the course of four decades. He also served as the undersecretary of state for political affairs from 1997 to 2000, and holds the rank career ambassador—the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service.

Ambassador Pickering's visit is sponsored by the School of International Affairs, and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

“Infrastructures of Water and Visuality: Thinking with Sleep Dealer and Arido Movie”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 16, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Adriana Johnson, University of California, Irvine

Chinese Religious Citizenship: A Comparative Study of Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian Religious academies in Republican China

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Oct 18, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Bin Chen, Penn State

Bin Chen's talk seeks to present Chinese the main argument of his dissertation. In twentieth-century China, Republican regimes and ruling elites largely excluded religion from their visions of modern China. The state and elites considered citizens of Republican China as a group of “new people” who were fully committed to modernity and free from “backward” superstitions or belief. However, the concept of citizenship was open to debate. While the state and elites did not include religion in their visions of modern citizens, the religious institutions responded through religious academies. In these academies, religious institutions constructed religious citizenship. They nurtured a new group of students who unquestionably defined themselves as members of modern China yet their markers of citizenship were inevitably connected to religion.

Different religious academies constructed religious citizenship differently. Buddhist academies were firmly adherent to the political rhetoric of Republican regimes. Buddhism academies and their students presented themselves as preservers of essential Chinese culture. They argued that Republican regimes should patronize Buddhism and Buddhism was useful for nation-building, including nurturing “citizens.” The Islamic academies, in particular, the Chengda Teachers’ Academy, incorporated citizenship with Islamic religious practices. They argued that to be a good citizen was crucial for a Hui to be a good Muslim. Christian academies, like the Suzhou Yates Academy, presented the Christian education as the ideal education for citizens. Students who graduated from Yates might not be converts, but their understandings of citizenship were deeply influenced by Christian civic ethics: good citizens should break away from China’s superstitious past, arm themselves with scientific knowledge, and actively engage in sports and public affairs.

Bin Chen is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the Penn State University. He is currently working on a dissertation that compares Islamic, Buddhist, and Christian religious academies and their interactions with the broader society. The dissertation seeks to alter our understanding of China’s modernization, arguing that the modernization process in modern China was inextricably linked with religious institutions.

“Family and its discontent in early Chinese thought”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 23, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Tao Jiang, Rutgers University

FLAS information session

Information session
Oct 24, 2017
04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
308 Boucke

The Center for Global Studies is pleased to announce the competition for FLAS Fellowships for the Pennsylvania State University. FLAS Fellowships are authorized under Title VI of the Higher Education Act and are administered by the U.S. Department of Education. They assist undergraduate and graduate students in achieving competency in selected foreign languages and conducting research in related international and area studies. Learn more about this exciting opportunity by coming to our informational session and by visiting our FLAS page. Students from all disciplines are encouraged to apply.

Echoes of 20th Century Fascism in Modern Politics and Culture

Panel Discussion
Oct 24, 2017
06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
109 Walker

Bringing together faculty and graduate students from both the Political Science and History departments, "Echoes of 20th Century Fascism" provides a platform to discuss varying perspectives on a complex and pertinent topic: the history of Fascist thought in the United States and globally and how this relates to the current political climate.  This event seeks to bring together faculty and students - university-wide as well as the general public to discuss the importance of using history to understand recent events. 

Wadjda (2012)

CGS Arabic Film Series
Oct 24, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

An enterprising Saudi girl signs up for her school's Koran recitation competition as a way to raise the remaining funds she needs in order to buy the green bicycle that has captured her interest.

Directed by Haifaa Al-Mansour.

“When Species Meet: A Comparative Reading of Wolf Totem and Disgrace”

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 30, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Hansong Dan, Nanjing University

Race in the Americas 2017 Conference

Conference
Nov 03, 2017 12:00 PM to
Nov 04, 2017 04:30 PM
102 Oak Building

Keynote speaker: Micol Seigel, Indiana University, Bloomington

The Race in the America Conference (RITA) at Penn State is a forum for future academics, professionals, and activists engaged in the study of racial paradigms in the Americas. With a history of participants from around the country, RITA seeks to bring together scholars dedicated to the study of the Hemispheric Americas from all disciplines and diverse occupational endeavors.

RITA’s mission is to foster intellectual discussion, research, and teaching on race, displacement, and immigration in Latin America, the Caribbean, and other geographies throughout the Americas; to promote the interests of its diverse participants; and to encourage civic engagement through network building and public debate on political and racial issues in the Hemispheric American context. RITA hopes to foster meaningful engagement with the economic, social, and political conditions of racialized subjects throughout the region, and build a vibrant community of inquiry and innovation at each meeting. The title for the 2017 Conference is "Space/Place/Race: Geography and Power in the Americas". 

The Joke is Mightier than the Sword

Lecture followed by signing of Youssef's Revolution for Dummies
Nov 03, 2017
04:30 PM to 06:30 PM
Nittany Lion Inn, University Park

BASSEM YOUSSEF, dubbed the Jon Stewart of the Arab World, was the host of the popular TV show AlBernameg which was the first of its kind, political satire show in the Middle East. Originally a 5-minute show on YouTube, AlBernameg became the first online to TV conversion in the Middle East and the most watched show across the region with 30 million viewers every week.

AlBernameg received worldwide acclaim with coverage in some of the biggest media outlets. In June 2013, Youssef hosted Jon Stewart on AlBernameg in Cairo marking the second season’s peak.

Throughout its three seasons, AlBernameg remained controversial through its humorous yet bold criticism of the ruling powers, which led to several lawsuits being filed against the show and its host. Youssef was even issued an arrest warrant in March 2013 and turned himself in the next day; following five hours of questioning, he was released on bail.

In recognition of his success, Youssef was named one of Time Magazine’s most influential people for 2013 under the “Pioneers” category. He was awarded the International Press Freedom Award by the CPJ and was chosen by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the leading global thinkers during the same year.

During its third season, the show achieved unprecedented weekly viewership ratings for 11 consecutive weeks. In June 2014, after a six-week break, the AlBernameg team held a press conference where Youssef announced the termination of the show due to overwhelming pressures on both the show and the airing channel.

In the spring 2015, Youssef served as a resident fellow at the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and was a resident fellow at Stanford University in fall 2016. During his stay in the US, he appeared on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart as a Senior Middle East Correspondent, commenting on the political situation in the region.

Youssef’s most recent projects include Democracy Handbook, a ten-part series exploring topics of democracy on fusion.net, the launch of his new book Revolution for Dummies: Laughing Through the Arab Spring in March 2017, and the release of Tickling Giants, a documentary film about Bassem Youssef directed by Sara Taksler, in April 2016.

This event will be followed by a signing of Youssef's Revolution for Dummies. Youssef's visit is co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, Africana Research Center, African Studies Program, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Sociology, Egyptian Student Association, McCourtney Institute for Democracy, Migration Studies Project, Paterno Fellows Program, Rock Ethics Institute, School of International Affairs, and Schreyer Honors College. Additional funding is provided by UPAC - Your Student Activity Fee at Work.

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Film screening of Tickling Giants followed by discussion with Bassem Youssef and Sara Taksler

film screening, panel discussion, book signing, reception
Nov 04, 2017
05:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Katz Auditorium, University Park

In the midst of the Egyptian Arab Spring, Bassem Youssef makes a decision that’s every mother’s worst nightmare... He leaves his job as a heart surgeon to become a full-time comedian.

Dubbed, “The Egyptian Jon Stewart,” Bassem creates the satirical show, AlBernameg. The weekly program quickly becomes the most viewed television program in the Middle East, with 30 million viewers per episode. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart averaged two million viewers.

In a country where free speech is not settled law, Bassem’s show becomes as controversial as it popular. He and his staff must endure physical threats, protests, and legal action, all because of jokes. As Bassem attempts to remain on the air, keep his staff safe, and not get arrested, he continues to hold those in power accountable. Despite increasing danger, the team at AlBernameg employs comedy, not violence, to comment on hypocrisy in media, politics, and religion.

Tickling Giants follows the team of AlBernameg as they discover democracy is not easily won. The young women and men working on Bassem’s show are fearless revolutionaries, who just happen to be really, really funny.

Bassem Youssef, dubbed the Jon Stewart of the Arab World, was the host of the popular TV show AlBernameg. Throughout its three seasons, the show remained controversial through its humorous yet bold criticism of the ruling powers, which led to several lawsuits being filed against the show and its host. Youssef was even issued an arrest warrant in March 2013 for being "anti-Islam" and for insulting the President. 

A senior producer at The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Sara Taksler has pitched stories and jokes, and researched footage for over a decade. Taksler’s first film, Stop the Ignorance: The Beauty That Is New Jersey, was a tribute to her home state. Her latest documentary, Tickling Giants, had its world premiere at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival.

Youssef's visit is co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, Africana Research Center, African Studies Program, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, Department of History, Department of Sociology, Egyptian Student Association, McCourtney Institute for Democracy, Migration Studies Project, Paterno Fellows Program, Rock Ethics Institute, School of International Affairs, and Schreyer Honors College. Additional funding is provided by UPAC – Your Student Activity Fee at Work.

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The Postprint Production of The Silent History: Entwining Media and Human Obsolescence

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Nov 06, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

N. Katherine Hayles, Duke University

N. Katherine Hayles, the James B. Duke Professor of Literature at Duke University, teaches and writes on the relations of literature, science and technology in the 20th and 21st centuries. Her books have won numerous awards, including the Rene Wellek Prize for the Best Book in Literary Theory in 1998-99 for How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics, and the Suzanne Langer Award for Outstanding Scholarship for Writing Machines. She teaches courses on experimental fiction, literary and cultural theory, finance capital and culture, science fiction, and contemporary American fiction. Her latest book is Unthought: The Power of the Cognitive Nonconscious.

Photography and Migration in Interwar Senegal and France

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 08, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Johann Le Guelte, Penn State

Photography was a central tool of the French colonial bureaucracy. Following World War I and the massive deployment of Senegalese soldiers (tirailleurs sénégalais) to the French metropole, authorities implemented various strategies to control the movements of colonial subjects. In this talk, I will explore the politics of administrative photography (identification cards, livrets, passports etc.) in interwar Senegal and France, and its effects on intercolonial migrations. My archival research conducted in both Senegal and France and funded by CGS demonstrates that the empire relied on photography to act as a deterrent to migration. However, colonial subjects used photography in alternative ways in order to bypass and subvert new administrative restrictions.

Johann Le Guelte is a fifth-year doctoral Candidate in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at Penn State. His dissertation, Uncovering the Colonial Lens: Creation and Subversion of the French Visual Empire, explores how France, during the 1920s and 1930s, developed a visual empire as part of its colonial apparatus. During these years, the colonial state was involved to an unprecedented extent in the production and dissemination of colonial photographs, thereby fixing the stereotypical representation of the colonial other. In turn, however, he looks at photographers in French West Africa who created spaces of photographic "resistance" (a different esthétique de soi). By focusing on one colony – Senegal – he shows how the appropriation by locals of image-production created a visual counter-discourse, inviting the bodies of those under colonial rule to overturn the Western state’s perpetuation of a constructed colonial “savagery.

Towards an Oil Inventory

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Nov 13, 2017
12:15 AM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jennifer Wenzel, Columbia University

The Clausal Architecture in Naturally Acquired German by Adult Korean Native Speakers

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 15, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Hyoun-A Joo, Penn State

In this lecture, Hyoun-A is presenting her dissertation research where she is asking how the German syntactic structure found representation in the minds of Korean immigrants in Germany. In the 70s, many Koreans moved to Germany for work purposes and they acquired German predominantly naturally by living and working in Germany rather than through formal instruction. Today, after more than 40 years, this population’s L2 German acquisition has reached a stable state and they developed into very different levels of proficiency. This presents a favorable situation to investigate the syntactic structure of German as it may have taken different forms in the minds of natural L2 acquirers. By pursuing this research, Hyoun-A aims to evaluate theories about the development of the German syntactic structure with insights from a matured clausal architecture, thereby advancing our understanding of how languages are acquired.

Hyoun-A is a graduate student in the German Department pursuing a dual degree in German Applied Linguistics and Language Science. Her current research interests involve second language acquisition and maintenance, as well as syntax. Having grown up within two languages and cultures, Hyoun-A developed a natural interest for bi-/multilingualism, which led her to work in Berlin, Seoul, and now Penn State. Her life and work experience in three different countries crucially shaped her sensitivity for ‘global citizenship’ that she also integrates into her research.

Nobel Prize Kazuo Ishiguro Roundtable Discussion

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Nov 27, 2017
12:15 AM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Reading the Beast: A Brief Look at the Modern Literary Bestiary

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Dec 04, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Melanie Nicholson, Bard College

Melanie Nicholson is a Professor of Spanish at Bard College.  She received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature from the University of Texas at Austin.  She is the author of Evil, Madness, and the Occult in Argentine Poetry (2002) and Surrealism in Latin American Literature:  Searching for Breton's Ghost (2013).  Her articles on Latin American poetry have appeared in Latin American Literary Review, Letras Femeninas, Critica Hispanica, Studies in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature, and Journal of European Studies, among others. She has published translations in Yale ReviewPuerto del Sol, and Translation Review. Prof. Nicholson is currently working on a book that explores the bestiary and the beast fable in modern world literature. She is also co-editing a collection of essays called Teaching Modern Latin American Poetries, forthcoming in 2018 with the Modern Languages Association.

Terrorism

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Jan 17, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. James Piazza, Penn State

Dr. Piazza is Professor of Political Science. His research focuses on terrorism and political violence. Specific interests include: socioeconomic roots of terrorism; regime-type, human rights, repression and terrorism; state failure and terrorism; religion, ideology and terrorist organizations and behavior; ethnic minorities and terrorism; the global narcotics trade and terrorism; natural resources and conflict; right-wing extremism in the United States; public opinion and counterterrorism. His work has been published in the American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Comparative Political Studies, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Public Choice, Journal of Peace Research, Political Psychology, Conflict Management and Peace Science, Political Research Quarterly, Foreign Policy Analysis, International Interactions, Defence and Peace Economics, Southern Economic Journal, Security Studies, Terrorism and Political Violence and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism.

World Stories Alive! Arabic

World Stories Alive! Series
Jan 20, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Liberal Arts Career Week

College of Liberal Arts event
Jan 22, 2018 09:00 AM to
Jan 26, 2018 03:00 PM

Liberal Arts Career Week (January 22-26, 2018) is a week-long event designed to provide students with opportunities to develop professional skills and provide networking opportunities that will support their future career paths. By participating in this week’s employer and alumni panels, workshops, and networking events, students can learn skills needed to embark on their career journey and achieve success in their professional lives.

Join the Liberal Arts Career Enrichment Network and take advantage of all the great events and networking opportunities!

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Money, Women, Romance: Counterfeits in Cervantes

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Jan 22, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Elizabeth Lagresa-Gonzalez, Penn State

After receiving degrees in Comparative Literature from UCLA and UCSB, Elizabeth S. Lagresa-González obtained a Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literatures from Harvard University. Her main area of specialization is early modern literature and culture, which she addresses at the intersection of gender, visual and material studies. In addition to peer-reviewed articles published in eHumanista and Comitatus, among others, she has co-authored a book chapter on collaborative approaches to the Digital Humanities, as well as a critical edition and English translation of Bernat Metge’s Lo Somni / The Dream. Her future monograph, tentatively titled, From Renegades to Cannibals: Early Modern Cross-Cultural Encounters, continues to build on her doctoral work by expanding on her interest in the exchange of objects and subjects across national and disciplinary borders. She is a Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow at the Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University.

Climate Change

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Jan 24, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Richard Alley, Penn State

Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor in the Penn State Department of Geosciences at the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, will speak about climate change at the Penn State School of International Affairs’ spring colloquium.

Alley has authored more than 170 refereed scientific publications about the relationships between Earth's cryosphere and global climate change. Alley testified about climate change before the U.S. House Committee on Science and Technology in 2007 and 2010. His 2007 testimony was due to his role as a lead author of "Chapter 4: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground" for the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He has participated in the joint United Nations World Meteorological Organization panel since 1992, having been a contributing author to both the second and third IPCC assessment reports.

Jobs and Internships in the Government

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
124 Sparks Building

Join a recruiter from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management to learn more about the government’s recruitment and hiring processes for full-time and internships along with helpful tips for navigating USAjobs.gov.

Federal Resume Workshop

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
03:15 PM to 04:15 PM
124 Sparks Building

Join a recruiter from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management to learn how to write a federal resume and when to use it.

Government & Social Services Employer Panel and Networking

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
05:30 PM to 07:00 PM
134 HUB

Join recruiters from a variety of organizations within government and social services in a panel discussion. Recruiters will be available after for one on one questions. Organizations include U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Centre County Children & Youth Services, PA State Police, & more.

World Stories Alive! Russian

World Stories Alive! Series
Jan 27, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

On the Evolution of an Absurdist Proto-Existentialist: the Physical, Mental, and Spiritual in the Art of Daniil Kharms (1905-1942)

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Jan 29, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alex Cigale, Queens College of the City University of New York

An Evening with Lisa Ko

Author Visit
Jan 29, 2018
06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Lisa Ko, Author

Join us for an evening with Lisa Ko author of National Book Award Finalist, The Leavers. Ko will discuss her novel and answer readers’ questions. Presented in partnership with Schlow Library and the Diversity Council within Penn State’s Office of Outreach and Online Education.

Nation Building

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Jan 31, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Peter Van Buren, author and 24-year veteran of the State Department

Peter Van Buren is a retired 24-year veteran of the U.S. Department of State. He spent a year in Iraq as a State Department Foreign Service Officer serving as Team Leader for two Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs). Now in Washington, he writes about Iraq and the Middle East at his blog, We Meant Well. His first book, We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People, was published in 2011, and his latest book, Ghosts of Tom Joad: A Story of the #99Percent, has just been published.

World Stories Alive! Turkish

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 03, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

"How wonderfully this language falls on the ear": Postlanguage & Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq’s Leg Over Leg

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 05, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Yasser Elhariry, Dartmouth College

Yasser Elhariry is Assistant Professor of French at Dartmouth College. He is the author of "Pacifist Invasions: Arabic, Translation & the Postfrancophone Lyric" (Liverpool University Press, 2017), and guest editor of the special issue of Expressions maghrébines on "Cultures du mysticisme" (Winter 2017). With Edwige Tamalet Talbayev, he is coeditor of a collection of essays on the modern Mediterranean titled "Critically Mediterranean: Temporalities, Aesthetics & Deployments of a Sea in Crisis," forthcoming in Palgrave’s Mediterranean Perspectives series in 2018. His essay, "Abdelwahab Meddeb, Sufi Poets & the New Francophone Lyric" (2016), was awarded the Modern Language Association’s 53rd Annual William Riley Parker Prize for an outstanding article published in PMLA. His writing appears in French Forum, Parade sauvage, Contemporary French Civilization, Francosphères, Europe, and in several edited volumes. This talk is based on new writing toward a second book on postlanguage, sound poetics, love, eroticism and mysticism in francoarabic literature, poetry and cinema from 1855 to the present.

Discussion on Religion

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 07, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Roger Finke, Penn State

Roger Finke is a Penn State professor of sociology and religious studies in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. He is also the Director of the Association of Religion Data Archives and is the President of the Association for the Sociology of Religion. Professor Finke co-authored two influential books with sociologist of religion Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990: Winners and Losers in Our Religious Economy received the 1993 Distinguished Book Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion. Acts of Faith: Explaining the Human Side of Religion received the 2001 Book Award from the American Sociological Association's Sociology of Religion Section. These books extended what is often called the New Paradigm or the Rational Choice theoretical perspective, conceptualizing denominations as competitors in a religious market. The Churching of America was methodologically noteworthy for demonstrating the utility of quantitative historical data on church membership. Additionally, Finke is the co-author of The Price of Freedom Denied: Religious Persecution and Conflict in the Twenty-first Century and Places of Faith: A Road Trip Across America's Religious Landscape. He is author or co-author of numerous peer-reviewed articles appearing in edited volumes and journals such as American Sociological Review, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Review of Religious Research, Social Science Research, and The Sociological Quarterly.

Professor Finke was the founding director of the American Religion Data Archive, which was renamed as the Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) in 2005. Supported by the Lilly Endowment and the John Templeton Foundation, the ARDA is a diverse, freely-available online digital library offering American and international data files, along with tools and resources to assist educators, journalists, religious congregations, and researchers. Finke is also a Fellow of the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion and a past President of the Association for the Study of Religion, Economics, and Culture.

World Stories Alive! Korean

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 10, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

"The Poetics of Displacement: Self-Translation among Russian-American Poets"

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 12, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Adrian Wanner, Penn State University

Adrian Wanner is Liberal Arts Professor of Slavic Languages and Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University.  He specializes in Russian literature, diaspora studies and the theory and practice of translation.  His latest books are Out of Russia: Fictions of a New Translingual Diaspora (Northwestern UP, 2011), a German verse translation of the poetry of Vladislav Khodasevich (Arco Verlag, 2013), and The Bilingual Muse: Self-Translation among Russian Poets (Northwestern UP, forthcoming).

Post-Holocaust Antisemitism and the Psychiatry of Trauma

Feb 12, 2018
05:00 PM to 06:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Pattee Library

Dr. Dagmar Herzog, City University of New York

In this paper, Professor Herzog will revisit the emotionally and politically charged conflicts among medical professionals in West Germany, the United States, and Israel over reparations for damages to mental health incurred by survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. Emphasizing the resurgence of anti-Semitism and resentment against survivors in the wake of Nazism’s defeat, as well as prominent medical professionals’ hostility toward survivors, she will show how in this context a handful of doctors sympathetic to the survivors eventually were able to develop the concepts of “massive psychic trauma” and “post-traumatic stress disorder.” She will also explore the unexpected consequences arising from the strategic entwining of the causes of Holocaust survivors and veterans of the Vietnam War – and the effects this had as mental health professionals working with survivors of torture in the Latin American dictatorships grappled with the limits of the concept of PTSD.

Dagmar Herzog is Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She writes on the histories of religion, the Holocaust and its aftermath, and gender and sexuality. Her most recent book is Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes (2017) and she is currently working on a project entitled Unlearning Eugenics: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Disability in Post-Nazi Europe.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Department of History, The Rock Ethics Institute, the German Studies Department, the Jewish Studies Program, and the Center for Global Studies.

Studying a Foreign Language in a Globalizing World: The Case of Hindi-Urdu

Feb 16, 2018
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
NEW LOCATION: 463 Burrowes Building

Dr. Richard Delacy, Harvard University

What does it mean to study a ‘foreign’ language in an academic environment in today’s rapidly changing world, in which technology has seemingly erased national and linguistic boundaries? In a world in which English appears to have become the dominant language of the global academic marketplace, and where many who come to study in institutions of higher learning in the US are bilingual, if not multilingual, how does this impact the notion that students should study a ‘foreign’ language as a part of a liberal arts education? Where does Hindi-Urdu, arguably the language(s) of over 500 million people, fit into this equation, particularly given people’s seemingly insatiable appetite for English in India and Pakistan? In this talk, Dr. Delacy will discuss studying a language (or languages) like Hindi-Urdu and the meaning that this can provide in the 21st century, in a world that appears to be rapidly changing and increasingly utilitarian in nature.

 

Richard Delacy teaches Hindi-Urdu in the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University. He writes about contemporary South Asian culture and society, in particular literary fiction and Bollywood cinema. He completed a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in South Asian Languages and Civilizations and before this a Masters in Indian History in Australia, where he was born and raised before settling in the US. He has authored several books related to the teaching of Hindi and Urdu, including a Hindi-English/English-Hindi dictionary, and is currently working on a book on commercial Hindi cinema (Bollywood), as well as one on the contemporary Hindi literary novel. He has been traveling to India for almost thirty years and has spent an aggregate of almost eight years there over more than thirty visits. (Source: https://alumni.harvard.edu/travel/leaders/richard-delacy)

Amor caduco: Love, Aging, and Women Writers in the Spanish Enlightenment

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 19, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Elizabeth Franklin Lewis, University of Mary, Washington

Nasser’s Republic, The Making of Modern Egypt

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Feb 20, 2018
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Nasser’s Republic, The Making of Modern Egypt is the first film for an American audience about one of the Arab world’s most transformative leaders. Seemingly coming out of nowhere, Gamal Abdel Nasser soon became a symbol of Arab progress and dignity. From 1952 to 1970, he challenged Western hegemony abroad, confronted Islamism at home, and faced deep divisions among the Arabs. He also established the region's first military authoritarian regime. A man of enormous charisma and ambition, Nasser had begun a revolution he could not complete. But his dreams, dilemmas and decisions continue to shape the current generation.

Producer Michal Goldman began work on this project before the January 2011 uprisings in Egypt and continued filming through General Sisi’s first year in power. During this period of turmoil, Egyptians argued passionately about their history as a way to see what course to follow in the future. It is their voices – peasants and professors, secularists and Islamists – that drive this film.

Global Commons

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 21, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Leif Trana, Economic Minister with the Norwegian Embassy

Leif Trana, Minister Counsellor for Economic Affairs at the Embassy of Norway will present "Managing the Global Commons: Norway's Interests in the Arctic" as part of the Penn State School of International Affairs’ spring colloquium. The Arctic is Norway’s top policy issue.

Before joining the Embassy of Norway in August 2014, Trana serviced as the director of the section for organizational development in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Oslo. In this position, he focused on how to align the resources used at various embassies with Norwegian interests in the corresponding country or organization. Before that, he was deputy director int eh same section. He spent five years working on World Trade Organization matters focusing on the agricultural and the National Agri-Marketing Association negotiations in the Doha Development Agenda. Trana is a career foreign-service officer who has served in Riyadh and Washington. He received his M.A. in economics from the University of Oslo.

Survivors: Psychological Trauma and Memory Politics in Hiroshima and Auschwitz

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Feb 21, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Ran Zwigenberg, Penn State

In 1962 a young Jewish-American psychiatrist by the name of Robert J. Lifton came to Hiroshima to conduct research on the psychiatric impact of the A-bomb. His research, combined with research on Holocaust survivors and Vietnam veterans was crucial in the making of what is now known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Lifton’s work was entangled with and contributed to the history of memory in Japan and the west. Based on his award winning book, Hiroshima: the Origins of Global Memory Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2014) as well as more recent research, Ran Zwigenberg’s talk will examine these entanglements and connections between the medical reaction to the Holocaust and Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the politics of memory in both contexts. What stood in the center of both histories were the survivors of the events, who became focal points of growing body of research as well as political symbols. The ‘survivor’, Zwigenberg argues, developed historically as a transnational category that drew on many sources, both within what came to be known as Holocaust discourse and outside of it. The convergence of the histories of Hiroshima and the Holocaust in the late sixties and seventies and the making of the category of PTSD (as well as the subsequent rise of trauma studies) led to the formation of survivorhood as an expansive, universal category that was used beyond the confines of the two cases of mass-killings. 

Ran Zwigenberg is assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on modern Japanese and European history, with a specialization in memory and intellectual history. He has taught and lectured in the United States, Europe, Israel, and Japan, and published on issues of war memory, atomic energy, psychiatry, and survivor politics.  Zwigenberg’s first book, Hiroshima: The Origins of Global Memory Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2014), winner of the 2016 Association for Asian Studies’ John W. Hall book award, deals comparatively with the commemoration and the reaction to the Holocaust and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. For more information on this and other projects, please see https://pennstate.academia.edu/RanZwigenberg

World Stories Alive! Chinese

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 24, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Mésaventures: The Politics and Poetics of the Dictator-Novel in the African Postcolony

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 26, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Dr. Magalí Armillas-Tiseyra, Penn State

Dr. Magalí Armillas-Tiseyra is the Caroline D. Eckhardt Early Career Professor of Comparative Literature and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Comparative Literature at Penn State. Her work centers on African and Latin American literatures, with a focus on the intersection of large-scale frameworks—including World Literature, the Global Anglophone, and in particular the Global South—with local and regional specificities. She has published essays on such topics as women’s writing in nineteenth-century Argentina, the function of the fetish in representations of the African dictator, Africa and science fiction, and magical realism in the South Atlantic; she is also the co-founder and co-director of the website, Global South Studies. Her first book, The Dictator-Novel: Writers and Politics in the Global South, is under contract with Northwestern UP, and her talk today is drawn from the fourth chapter of that manuscript.  

The Media

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 28, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Steve Mufson, The Washington Post

An Automaton’s Interiority: Ajeeb in Brazil, 1896

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 12, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Paul Johnson, University of Michigan

Events Tied to the Transformation of China in the "New Era"

Mar 13, 2018 10:00 AM to
Mar 15, 2018 05:00 PM

Socialist Rule of Law and Governance After the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress

As part of a week of events tied to the transformation of China in the "New Era"—"The Vanguard Acts: A Focus on China at the Dawn of its 'New Era'"—this roundtable brings together a group of scholars form China, Europe, and the U.S. who will consider the further implications of the 19th CPC Congress more specifically in the context of the important objectives of developing Socialist Rule of Law and governance. That exploration implicates significant initiatives both internally and in the context of China’s growing external relations. Participants will consider the development of internal disciplinary systems, their rules and structures, as well as Chinese external initiatives—principally the One Belt One Road Initiative. The relevance of big data management, artiifial intelligence, and algorithms will also be considered.

All are welcome to attend and participate either in person or through an interactive live streaming of the event. Participants will be afforded ample time for questions which may be submitted online or in person.

For more information, please visit the Coalition for Peace and Ethics website.

Date/Time: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
Location: 232 Katz Building

 

Teach-In: China in the "New Era"

As part of a week of events tied to the transformation of China in the "New Era"—"The Vanguard Acts: A Focus on China at the Dawn of its 'New Era'"—this conference includes panels discussing issues of governance in China in the wake of the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress (October 2017) and a roundtable discussion on the implications of these changes as China broadens its engagement with the world through its One Belt One Road Initiative and its more muscular engagement in international public organizations.

For more information, please visit the Coalition for Peace and Ethics website.

Date/Time: Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 336 Katz Building

Rule of Law and Governance in China at Home and Abroad

As part of a week of events tied to the transformation of China in the "New Era"—"The Vanguard Acts: A Focus on China at the Dawn of its 'New Era'"—this conference includes panels discussing issues of governance in China in the wake of the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress (October 2017) and a roundtable discussion on the implications of these changes as China broadens its engagement with the world through its One Belt One Road Initiative and its more muscular engagement in international public organizations.

For more information, please visit the Coalition for Peace and Ethics website.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 110 Katz Building

Retracting the claws of conflict: Interventions to reduce intergroup hostility

Mar 13, 2018
04:45 PM to 06:15 PM
124 Sparks Building

Dr. Emile Bruneau, University of Pennsylvania

In this talk, Emile Bruneau will present discouraging evidence demonstrating the prevalence, virulence and real-world consequence of dehumanization and collective blame in intergroup contexts. He will then present the encouraging evidence for novel intervention strategies that can markedly and durably reduce dehumanization and collective blame, which have downstream impacts on intergroup policy preferences and behaviors.

Emile Bruneau is a research associate and lecturer at the Annenberg School for Communication and director of the Peace and Conflict Neuroscience Lab. Bruneau is also the lead scientist at the Beyond Conflict Innovation Lab. Prior to his formal training in neuroscience, Bruneau worked, traveled, and lived in a number of conflict regions: South Africa during the transition from Apartheid to Democracy, Sri Lanka during one of the largest Tamil Tiger strikes in that nation's history, Ireland during "The Troubles," Israel/Palestine around the Second Intifada.

Bruneau is now working to bring the tools of science to bear on the problem of intergroup conflict by (1) building methods to better characterize the (often unconscious) cognitive biases that drive conflict using explicit, implicit and functional neuroimaging (fMRI) techniques, and (2) critically evaluating efforts aimed at transcending these biases. These efforts have focused on three psychological processes relevant to intergroup conflict: empathy, dehumanization, and motivated reasoning, and involve target groups that are embroiled in intractable conflict (e.g., Israelis and Palestinians), or subject to extreme hostility (e.g., Muslims in the U.S., the Roma in Europe).

Source: https://www.asc.upenn.edu/node/4135

Doing Development Right

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 14, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Greg Gottleib, Tufts University

World Stories Alive! Hindi

World Stories Alive! Series
Mar 17, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Meat, or, the Freeplay of Signifiers

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 19, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Dr. Hector Hoyos, Stanford University

Tickling Giants (Encore screening)

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Mar 20, 2018
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

In the midst of the Egyptian Arab Spring, Bassem Youssef makes a decision that’s every mother’s worst nightmare... He leaves his job as a heart surgeon to become a full-time comedian.

Dubbed, “The Egyptian Jon Stewart,” Bassem creates the satirical show, AlBernameg. The weekly program quickly becomes the most viewed television program in the Middle East, with 30 million viewers per episode. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart averaged two million viewers.

In a country where free speech is not settled law, Bassem’s show becomes as controversial as it popular. He and his staff must endure physical threats, protests, and legal action, all because of jokes. As Bassem attempts to remain on the air, keep his staff safe, and not get arrested, he continues to hold those in power accountable. Despite increasing danger, the team at AlBernameg employs comedy, not violence, to comment on hypocrisy in media, politics, and religion.

Tickling Giants follows the team of AlBernameg as they discover democracy is not easily won. The young women and men working on Bassem’s show are fearless revolutionaries, who just happen to be really, really funny.

Intelligence and National Security

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 21, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, Former Chief of Staff to U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell

Chinese Visceral Dryness, Western Hysteria? Chinese Medicine, Mental Pathology, and Gender in Modern China

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 21, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Xiaoran He, Penn State

This talk tells the history of "visceral dryness," a term of Chinese medicine in reference to hysteria today. Through tracing how it transformed from an emotional disorder in the late imperial period into a modern mental illness, it argues for Chinese medicine's participation in and contribution to the newly formed medical space of mental illness in Republican China. Although advocates of Chinese medicine had been introducing Japan-mediated psy knowledge for decades, it was the 1929 political crisis that propitiated them to adjust themselves in meeting the challenges and attacks from Western medicine and in so doing reformulated their conventional wisdom of "visceral dryness." This turned out to be a successful story for two reasons. One the one hand, "visceral dryness,” re-interpreted and reframed by doctors of Chinese medicine in terms of the standards set by Western biomedicine in attributing a mental illness, was widely recognized by the Chinese public. On the other hand, the reinvented medical term further promoted to popularize the Freudian theory on hysteria, serving as a vehicle for expressing the public concern over mental health and hygiene—especially the mental wellbeing of women. The modern history of “visceral dryness” was, in other words, a story of how an old idea was reconfigured into a new context and how a professionally-defined medical vocabulary entered into the everyday lexicon of self-knowledge. 

Xiaoran He is a graduate student from the Department of History and Asian Studies at Penn State. Her research interest is the history of mental health in modern East Asia, medical humanities, and print culture in modern China. 

Poetry without Borders: Echoes of '68: Protest, Resistance, and Empowerment

Reading
Mar 21, 2018
06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Are you interested in experience a night of multicultural and multilingual poetry with Penn State students and faculty from all different backgrounds and research fields? Then please join us for Poetry Without Borders on March 21st, 6-7pm in Foster Auditorium (Paterno Library). Now in its 6th year, PwB is a poetry reading forum that brings together faculty and students from across the university to expose the audience to the power of poetry from different languages and cultures. The 2018 theme is "Echoes of '68: Protest, Resistance, and Empowerment", an inspiration for the readers to use poems that commemorate the 1968 student protests and the impact they have had on political and social movements up to the present day. 

We are also looking for readers who can contribute poems from a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds. For more information, visit http://poetrywithoutborderspsu.weebly.com. 

World Stories Alive! German

World Stories Alive! Series
Mar 24, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

The Animal Alliance: Living and Dying in the Extractive Zone

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Mar 26, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

 Jens Andermann, New York University

Jens Andermann is Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at New York University. He has published on a wide array of topics related to literature and visual and material cultures in 19th and 20th-century Latin America, especially Brazil, Argentina, and Chile. His books includeNew Argentine Cinema (2011), The Optic of the State: Visuality and Power in Argentina and Brazil (2007), andImages of Power: Iconography, Culture, and the State in Latin America (2004). He is currently an editor of theJournal of Latin American Cultural Studies.

Why People Rebel - Greed versus Grievance

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 28, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Greg Kruczek, Virginia Tech

Kruczek graduated from Penn State in 2005 with a B.A. in Political Science and B.S. in Professional Golf Management. During time as an undergraduate, spent time in Cairo, Egypt and Beirut, Lebanon studying Arabic and each state's political culture. In Fall 2006 completed intensive Arabic program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Monterey, CA. Worked as Research Assistant at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies (Arlington, VA) from 2006-2007. In 2007 served as Information Officer at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. After a brief stint in Beirut in late-2007, returned to Penn State for his Masters, graduating from the School of International Affairs in 2009. Master's paper dealt with confessional politics in Lebanon. From 2010-2012 was a lead researcher in Penn State's College of Information Science and Technology on the counter-insurgency component of a Multi-University Research Initiative sponsored by the U.S. Army Research Lab. In 2011 joined the faculty of Susquehanna University as an instructor in the Department of Political Science, teaching classes on world politics and comparative domestic politics. In January 2013 began pursuing Ph.D in Government and International Affairs at Virginia Tech's Washington, D.C. campus under the guidance of Dr. Ariel Ahram. His dissertation topic concerns the Christian response to the Arab Spring.

American Servicemen's Transnational Experience in the China Relief Expedition of 1900

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 28, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Xiangyun Xu, Penn State

In June, 1900, the United States, together with several other nations like Great Britain, Japan, Russia, France, and Germany, launched a joint operation to relieve the Chinese Boxers' siege of Western personnel and Chinese Christian converts in Tianjin and Beijing. After this multi-national forces accomplished the above goal, it occupied these two cities for more than a year. Although the United States withdrew its forces early in May, 1901 for the ongoing conflict in the Philippines, the time in China still left a mark on American servicemen. Fighting alongside other forces and encountering them on city streets during the occupation, American servicemen formed their unique opinions of other nationals, perceptions that resurged in later warfare like the Russo-Japanese War of 1904 and the First World War. Besides, they also interacted with Chinese officials and civilians, which both reinforced and modified the concurrent racial stereotypes of Asians in the United States.

Xiangyun Xu obtained both his BA and MA in history from Peking University, China. The course of study there developed his interest in the American encounters with the outside world in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century. Starting from Fall 2014, he has been in the Department of History, Penn State as a PhD student and passed his comprehensive exam in Spring 2016. Since then, he has conducted a number of archival trips for his dissertation. Meanwhile, he also writes some pieces on the American history and politics for the general audience in China.

Iranian Film Festival

Mar 30, 2018 06:30 PM to
Apr 01, 2018 10:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

An Iranian film series scheduled for March 30 (6:30-10:30pm), March 31 (6-10pm), and April 1 (6-10pm). Ms. Shahrzad Dadgar, the organizer of a series of film festivals in the United States on Iranian movies, is the organizer of this three-day film festival.

Click here for the poster or click on the image below to enlarge: 

Co-sponsored by the Iranian Student Association (ISA), Penn State Libraries, and the Center for Global Studies.

Race and Distant Reading

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 02, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Richard Jean So, McGill University

The Case of Qayrawān: A Jewish Community in Muslim North Africa in the Making of the New Jewish "Bookshelf"

Apr 03, 2018
05:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Alumni Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn

Dr. Menachem Ben-Sasson, University of Jerusalem

On the southern shores of the Mediterranean, a new city was built towards the end of the 7th century, named Qayrawān. Rapidly it became the political, commercial, religious and intellectual hub of the whole Mediterranean. This presentation will focus on the Jewish intellectual life that flourished in Qayrawān, the creation of a new Jewish "Bookshelf" that spread throughout the Jewish world. The Jewish community in Qayrawān produced many pioneering works in all branches of knowledge, from Astronomy and Mathematics to Philosophy and Mysticism, as well as Law, secular and religious Poetry, Medicine, Linguistics, and History. Startling in its breadth, this literary productivity made breakthroughs in many fields. This local creativity occurred in dialogue with the global intellectual revolution following the Muslim conquest, and added to a deliberate trend of building rich libraries in Qayrawān at that time. Much of the current Jewish bookshelf is an "heir" of the Qayrawān Medieval "project". 

Menahem Ben-Sasson is a Professor in the Department of the History of the Jewish People at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. A historian of the heritage including Jewish Communities in Muslim Lands; the Relationship Between Religion and Economics; and Law and Spirituality as Sources of Authority in Medieval Oriental Society. He also specializes in the study of Maimonides, Geonic responsa and texts, Saadya Gaon's works and leadership, and the Cairo Genizah. Professor Ben-Sasson is Chancellor and past-President of the Hebrew University. He is a past Member of the Israeli Knesset, where he served as Chairman of the Knesset's Constitution, Law and Justice Committee, and headed the Knesset Lobby for Higher Education. He has also served as President of the World Union of Jewish Studies, Vice-President of the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, Chairman of the Ben-Zvi Institute for the Study of Jewish Communities in the East, and on the board of directors at Yah Vashem. 

Dealing with North Korea

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 04, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Evans Revere, Albright Stonebridge Group

Evans J.R. Revere will speak about current policy challenges in North Korea as part of the Penn State School of International Affairs' spring colloquium. Revere is senior director with the Albright Stonebridge Group, providing strategic advice to clients with a specific focus on Korea, China and Japan. Fluent in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, Revere retired from the Foreign Service in 2007 after a distinguished career as one of the U.S. Department of State's top Asia experts. He has extensive experience in negotiations with North Korea.

On Digital Colonialism and Monstrosity

Apr 06, 2018
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Morehshin Allahyari, artist

Born and raised in Iran, Morehshin Allahyari is a new-media artist and activist who has lived in the United States since 2007. In this lecture, she will reflect on the relationship between the use of digital technologies and activism, digital colonialism, and monstrosity and refiguring as it relates to her 2015 project Material Speculation: ISIS and its aftermath, as well as to a new in-progress project called She Who Sees the Unknown. She will also posit and contextualize “a position outside” that asks difficult questions and suggests alternative methods.

Co-sponsored by the Palmer Museum of Art, University Libraries, CIMP-3D, Bernard M. Gordon Learning Factory, Center for Global Studies, School of International Affairs, Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Central Pennsylvania Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, Rock Ethics Institute, and the Arts and Design Research Incubator (ADRI).

2018 Penn State-Pittsburgh Undergraduate Research Symposium in Global Studies

Undergraduate Research Symposium
Apr 06, 2018
10:00 AM to 01:00 PM
The Nittany Lion Inn, State College, PA

Global eyes: critical perspectives of an interconnected world

Abstracts due: March 15, 2018

Final papers due: March 28, 2018

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.  

We encourage a wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.

Students selected to present will be notified via email by March 19th; final papers will then be due March 28th by 5:00 p.m.

The Center for Global Studies at Penn State and the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center and the will host the event April 6, 2018 at The Nittany Lion Inn in State College, PA. The symposium will include a keynote lecture, student presentations and student networking.

Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Center for Global Studies’ website.

Do not hesitate to inquire if you have questions about paper topics or symposium logistics.

Penn State students should contact Sarah Lyall-Combs, Associate Director, Center for Global Studies at cgsinfo@psu.edu.

Pittsburgh students should contact Elaine Linn, Assistant Director for Academic Affairs, Global Studies Center at eel58@pitt.edu or (412) 648-2113.

How to Apply

Students must submit an application form and abstract (for help in writing effective abstracts visit here). From the submitted abstracts, a selection committee will determine which participants will be asked to forward finished research papers for participation at the symposium. Please forward finished research papers to Sarah Lyall-Combs at cgs.psu@gmail.com. Students will receive feedback based on specific judging criteria. 

Presenters will be grouped into panel sessions according to categories that emerge from the papers selected.

Preparing for the Symposium

Papers should be 8-10 pages in length and must be double-spaced with citations of at least eight resources (using MLA format). Please format your papers using a one inch margin and a 12-point standard font (Times New Roman and Arial for example).

Student presentations will be limited to 8 minutes with an additional five minutes for questions from faculty and audience. All rooms will be media equipped should you wish to prepare a Powerpoint to accompany your presentation.

A minimum of three judges will read the research papers prior to the event and provide comments. During the presentation sessions, the panel and audience will listen to each student’s presentation and ask questions.

Mediterranean Returns: Elegy and Forced Migration

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 09, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Angela Naimou, Clemson University

Angela Naimou is Associate Professor of English at Clemson University, where her research and teaching interests include contemporary literature and culture of the U.S., Caribbean, and Middle East; theories of race, ethnicity, migration, and diaspora; and the intersections of law, economy, and personhood. She is an Associate Editor for the journal College Literature (Johns Hopkins UP) and serves on the Editorial Board of Humanity Journal (U Penn). She is also Treasurer for The Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (ASAP).

Going Abroad in 2019

Apr 10, 2018
12:30 PM to 01:30 PM
124 Sparks

The U.S. Government sponsors several programs that will prepare you for an international career, including internships, study abroad funding, Peace Corps, and more. Application deadlines fall months in advance, so please start planning the year before you plan to go abroad. Learn more from career diplomat Usha Pitts at this session.

A light lunch will be served; RSVP required: http://bit.ly/SDGoingAbroad 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Usha Pitts is an American diplomat with twenty years in the U.S. Foreign Service, serving tours in Russia, Cuba, Panama, Italy, Austria, and Brazil. While Consul General in Recife (Brazil), she opened an American Chamber of Commerce in Fortaleza, and welcomed Vice President Joe Biden to Brazil for the 2014 soccer World Cup.

Ms. Pitts is currently posted to New York City, where she works as an educator and recruiter for the U.S. Department of State. Committed to ensuring our diplomats reflect the true face of America, Ms. Pitts recruits a diversity of American citizens to careers with the State Department. She teaches a course at The City College of New York on diplomacy, and offers advice to Americans who aspire to an international career.

Sponsored by the Schreyer Honors College, School of International Affairs, and the Center for Global Studies.

Careers in Diplomacy

Apr 10, 2018
05:00 PM to 06:30 PM
158 Willard Building

Few employers will pay you to live and work abroad, but the U.S. Department of State is one of them. They hire Americans over the age of 20 from all walks of life and backgrounds. If you are attracted to public service and want to live abroad, come hear more about this unique lifestyle from career diplomat Usha Pitts.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Usha Pitts is an American diplomat with twenty years in the U.S. Foreign Service, serving tours in Russia, Cuba, Panama, Italy, Austria, and Brazil. While Consul General in Recife (Brazil), she opened an American Chamber of Commerce in Fortaleza, and welcomed Vice President Joe Biden to Brazil for the 2014 soccer World Cup.

Ms. Pitts is currently posted to New York City, where she works as an educator and recruiter for the U.S. Department of State. Committed to ensuring our diplomats reflect the true face of America, Ms. Pitts recruits a diversity of American citizens to careers with the State Department. She teaches a course at The City College of New York on diplomacy, and offers advice to Americans who aspire to an international career.

Sponsored by the Schreyer Honors College, School of International Affairs, and the Center for Global Studies.

Demography, Fertility and Sustainability

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 11, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Karl Hofmann, Population Services International

Retired U.S. ambassador and SIA advisory board member Karl Hofmann is President and Chief Executive Officer of Population Services International, a Washington-based global health organization.  Mr. Hofmann is former U.S. Ambassador to Togo and Executive Secretary of the State Department.  He also served on President Clinton's National Security Council staff.

World Stories Alive! Igbo

World Stories Alive! Series
Apr 14, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Egyptian Cultural Night

Apr 14, 2018
06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Jury space, Stuckeman School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

Explore the rich history and culture of Egypt through a virtual tour of Old Cairo, songs, dance, and traditional food. Free and open to the public.

Co-sponsored by Penn State’s Arabic Program and the Center for Global Studies.

Effluence, “Waste” and African Humanism: Extra-Anthropocentric Being and Human Rightness

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 16, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Rosemary Jolly, Penn State University

Rose Jolly is the Weiss Chair of the Humanities: Literature and Human Rights – Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English, Rock Ethics Institute-Bioethics Program, African Studies, and Women’s Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She has published in the fields of South African literature and culture, postcolonial theory, and the critical medical humanities.  Her work has involved mixed quantitative and qualitative methodologies.  She is particularly experienced in qualitative analysis of oral testimony and tools of qualitative research that involve embodied gesture in addition to conventional verbalization. Students interested in the nexus of gender, race and state-sponsored aggression in contexts of colonization and related structural, violence, and the rhetoric of attempts at intergenerational peace-building in the wake of such violence, are welcome to contact her about their work. Lunch provided.

Krzysztof Czyżewski: The Borderland Foundation

Public Talk
Apr 17, 2018
05:00 PM to 06:00 PM
102 Weaver Building

Presented by the Penn State Jewish Studies Program, Department of History, Department of German and Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Center for Global Studies.

"The Art of Bridging in a Disenchated World: The Case of the Borderland Foundation," by Krzysztof Czyżewski. Czyżewski is the co-founder and president of the Borderland Foundation, Sejny, Poland.

“We wanted to build the interpersonal and intercultural 'connective tissue', here and now, in specific local communities, on the painful borderlands full of broken bridges, traumatic memories, frozen conflicts, separate national mythologies and libertarian myths that were painful to neighbors.”


More information about this event…

Why America Misunderstands the World

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 18, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Paul Pillar, Georgetown University

Beginning Bioinformatics, or, the Translation of "Translation"

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Apr 23, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Haun Saussy

Corruption and State Capture

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 25, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Vineeta Yadav, Penn State 

Toward Decolonial Feminisms

A Conference Inspired by the Work of María Lugones
May 11, 2018 08:00 AM to
May 13, 2018 12:00 PM
Nittany Lion Inn

Speakers include: Linda Martín Alcoff, Pedro DiPietro, Michael Hames Garcia, Kathryn Sophia Belle, Sarah Hoagland, María Lugones, Nelson Maldonado-Torres, José Medina, Eduardo Mendieta, Mariana Ortega, Omar Rivera, Shireen Roshanravan, Ofelia Schutte, Alejandro Vallega

For more information, visit: http://sites.psu.edu/lugonesconference/ 

CALPER Summer Workshop: "Effective Use of Technology in K-16 Chinese Language Classrooms"

Jun 22, 2018 09:00 AM to
Jun 23, 2018 05:00 PM
IST Building, Westgate E201, Penn State University Park Campus

Presenter: Shijuan Liu (Indiana University of Pennsylvania)

This two-day workshop introduces a wide range of resources and tools that are useful for Chinese language learning and teaching, facilitates discussions and provides hands-on practice on how to apply the technologies effectively in K-16 Chinese language classrooms for the purpose of improving student Chinese proficiency and empowering them with 21st century world language skills.

If you plan on attending, you may apply for a travel stipend.

More information: http://sites.psu.edu/calperworkshops

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