Curricular Materials for High School Educators

The Center for Global Studies is pleased to offer this page of resources for practicing K-12 teachers. The page is an extension of our workshops and outreach events. We invite you to review the pages and to use and adapt any parts for your use in the classroom.

High School Level [9-12] Curricular Materials Developed for the CGS

Discovering the Globe

Developed by Emily Hicks, Graduate Student, Department of Applied Linguistics, College of the Liberal Arts

This lesson is derived from Dr. Sophia McClennen's lessons for educators, "Discovering the Globe: Using Inquiry-Guided Learning to Teach Global Topics" and "How Do We Talk to Others-Challenges to Ethical Cross-Cultural Communication and Challenges to Diversity Training"

For grades 8-12

Water Sustainability Lesson

Developed by Elizabeth Troxell, 10th grade World History teacher and Your World in the 21st Century elective teacher, Penns Valley Area School District

The lesson below is an adapted lesson for this curriculum based on water sustainability. I designed this lesson for grades 9-12 but it could be easily accommodated to fit the needs of other ages and educational plans.

For grades 8-12

Objective:

Students will be able to understand that water is a finite natural resource whose quantity and quality must be responsibly preserved, protected, used, and reused.

Climate Change Argumentation

Developed by Carmen Vanderhoof, Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, Penn State

This lesson is derived from Dr. Peter Buckland’s sustainability presentation for the Center for Global Studies. Dr. Peter Buckland, a Penn State alumnus, is a postdoctoral fellow for the Sustainability Institute. He has drawn together many resources for teaching about climate change, sustainability, and other environmental issues. See The Field Guide for Teaching Sustainability.

For grades 8-12, may be modified for 5-7

Energy Crises Unit

Developed by Carmen Vanderhoof, Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, Penn State

This lesson is derived from Dr. Richard Alley’s sustainability presentation for the Center for Global Studies

For grades 8-12, may be modified for 5-7

Objective:

Students will be able to describe Pennsylvania’s energy usage over time using concrete historical examples. Students will engage in systems and design thinking in order to come up with feasible sustainability solutions. Students will draw connections between local and global energy usage over time in order to situate their community’s sustainability efforts and come up with workable solutions

Ancient Mediterranean Economy: An Early “Global” Market [Developed for World Culture: Grades 8-12]

Developed by Eric Welch, Department of History and Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Penn State

This lesson introduces students to the geography of the eastern Mediterranean while exploring one of the earliest international economies. Key concepts include the import and export of goods, international connections, and the use of archaeology for understanding ancient connections.

Objective:

  1. Review eastern Mediterranean geography, including ancient and modern territories
  2. Understand the diversity and extent of ancient trade (ancient trade doesn’t mean primitive trade).
  3. Understand how archaeology informs our understanding of ancient society and economy

World On Trial [Developed for Social Studies in Grades 7-12]

Developed by Dustin Lee Yenser, Middle Social Studies, Young Scholars of Central PA Charter School

This lesson plan is intended for use in conjunction with the World on Trial: Headscarf Law Episode. In 2004, the French government banned the conspicuous display of religious symbols in public schools. This most notably affected the right of young Muslim women to wear traditional headscarves or other forms of cover. Students will research the practice of covering and the motivation for the ban. They will then view a trial-format debate between experts in the World on Trial episode. Finally, they will analyze the arguments presented by both sides and register their own opinion in the ongoing debate. More info can also be found at World on Trial website.

Japanese Painting and Calligraphy on Scrolls [Developed for Visual Arts: Painting II in Grades 9-12]

Developed by Sherry Knight, Visual Arts Teacher, Trinity High School

Impact Award Submission from The Teaching Japan Workshop

Objective:

As a result of instruction, students will...

  1. Use specific watercolor techniques in a sketchbook exercise.
  2. Identify common elements of Japanese scrolls.
  3. Create a watercolor painting using a Japanese theme of landscape, birds and flowers, or figures. Subject matter may also include religion.
  4. Add calligraphy to painting and present in a finished state as a hanging scroll or a hand scroll.

Voices from Fukushima [Developed for Grades 9-12]

Developed by Beth Buglio, Japanese Language Teacher, Downingtown Area High School

Impact Award Submission from The Teaching Japan Workshop

Objective:

  1. Students will generate questions about what has happened to the environment and the people of Fukushima as a result of the tsunami and flooding of the nuclear power plant.
  2. Students will use primary source video testimony and interviews to gather information from many perspectives.
  3. Students will share information orally and take notes on ideas expressed by others.
  4. Students will integrate information on Fukushima into an opinion paper.

Energy Sources in Japan and USA [Developed for World Cultures in Grades 9-12]

Developed by Timothy Carley, Social Studies Teacher, Central Dauphin High School

Impact Award Submission from The Teaching Japan Workshop

Objective:

Students will come to understand the different types of energy sources and how they affect the people living around them.

Cultural Connections for Younger Students: A Party for a Japanese Refugee [Developed for Social Studies in Grades 9-12]

Developed by Dr. Sophia McClennen, Penn State, Professor of International Affairs and Comparative Literature

Based on a presentation by Dr. Sophia McClennen at the Teaching the Globe workshop

Objective:

Students will be able to engage in problem solving based on a scenario that requires them to demonstrate critical thinking, openness and empathy towards others.

Nicaraguan Youth Engagement Project [Developed for Spanish in Grades 9-12]

Developed by Simon Holowatz, M.Ed., Spanish Teacher, Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania

Part of the How to Incoporate Authentic Global Materials into the K-12 Classroom workshop

Objective:

Spanish language students will communicate directly with English language learners in Nicaragua. Both sets of students will practice the language they are learning. Through engaging with another student, each set of students will learn about the another culture and country in a way that personalizes them. This project is primarily meant to be an aid to learning a language, not to take the place of a Spanish language course. Students should receive guidance, feedback and a grade for their participation in this project.

Mapping the Middle East [Developed for Social Studies in Grades 10-12]

Developed by David Fuentes, Penn State Graduate Student, College of Education

Based on a presentation by Walter Lorenz, Lecturer in Arabic, Penn State at the Teaching the Globe workshop

Objective:

Students will be able to identify the various countries that comprise the "Middle East".  Students will be able to discuss some of the differences and similarities between the countries that comprise the region.

Teaching Japanese Visual Culture [Developed for Media Studies/Technologies in Grades 10-12]

Developed by David Fuentes, Penn State Graduate Student, College of Education

Based on a presentation by Dr. John Abel, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Asian Study, Penn State at the Teaching the Globe workshop

Objective:

Students will be able to demonstrate content knowledge of other cultures in order to help thinking about our place in the world. Students will be able to state observations and reflections on differences and similarities in cultural representation and use of media. Students will be able to evaluate and critique a media-saturated culture.

Language in the Non-Language Classroom [Developed for Foreign Languages/History/Social Studies in Grades 12]

Developed by Emily Hodge and Jennifer Lane, Penn State Graduate Students, College of Education

Based on a presentation by Walter Lorenz, Lecturer in Arabic, Penn State at the Teaching the Globe workshop

Objective:

Students will be able to demonstrate content knowledge of other cultures in order to help thinking about our place in the world. Students will be able to state observations and reflections on differences and similarities in cultural representation and use of media. Students will be able to evaluate and critique a media-saturated culture.

Japan: Sustainability and Home Lifestyle

Developed by Beth Buglio, High School Teacher, Downington Area School District

This unit connects everyday customs of Japanese life with steps toward sustainability. In an island country with urban population density seventeen times greater than American cities, efforts to live sustainably are a necessity. Japanese face challenges similar to ours as an urbanized, consumer culture, but the need to change lifestyle is more acutely felt.  The Japanese people bring to bear a highly cooperative sense of community, traditional values that deplore wastefulness, and new technological innovation. By studying how Japan faces the challenge of conserving water, energy, and material resources – including how to dispose of its waste – we may build concepts that will be useful in discussing our own issues of consumption and environmental impact. Interested teachers are encouraged to pick and choose among the activities in this unit, as there are resources that could be used to achieve learning outcomes at various levels.

Human Rights Unit

Developed by Christine Morris, World Cultures Teacher, Bellefonte Area High School

Eleanor Roosevelt, former first lady and United States delegate to the United Nations, was an integral member of the United Nations Human Rights Commission and was a driving force in the creation of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UN General Assembly, 1948). Referring to the Declaration as the “International Magna Carta for all mankind”, Roosevelt helped to inspire and guide future generations to share these principles (Glendon, 2000). Human rights are those rights that are accorded to everyone living on Earth. Since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has become policy, the world we have lived in has become complex and interconnected. Mrs. Roosevelt challenged future generations to take a stand and become an active global citizen.

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