2010 - 2011

Developing Content-based Thematic Units to Enhance Curricula

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June 23 & 24 - 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Presenter: Heather J. Hendry, University of Pittsburgh

Presented in conjunction with the Center for Advanced Language Proficiency Education and Research (CALPER), this workshop focuses on the curriculum development of content-based thematic units. The presenter will introduce a framework for developing curricula and guides the participants through the process of designing content-based thematic units. Participants will engage in hands-on demonstration lessons and explore a variety of content-based instructional strategies to promote students' skills in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communication. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will have developed their own units to enhance their curricula.

6th Annual Turkish Night

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Friday, May 6, 2011

6 - 9 p.m.

Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School 

Organized with the participation of the students, teachers, parents and members of the Centre Region community, this event celebrates Turkish culture through presentations, music, and food.

Teaching the Globe: Opportunities and Challenges to Teaching Global Topics in the 21st Century

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Saturday, May 7, 2011

325 Hetzel Union Building

Penn State University

University Park, PA

The workshop, for practicing K-12 classroom teachers, focuses on offering curricular ideas around various issues in global education. The integration of global education is imperative to develop the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed for responsible participation in a democratic society and in a global community in the twenty-first century.

View the Teaching the Globe: Opportunities and Challenges to Teaching Global Topics in the 21st Century page.

I Know What You Did Last Summer: A Forum on Career Paths in the Federal Intelligence Community

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Tuesday, April 26, 2011

3:00 - 4:15 p.m.

116 Katz Building

Have you ever been curious about a career in intelligence? If so, come and learn about the different career paths available within the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). An informal Q&A will follow the presentations.

From the Lab to the Field: An International Discussion of Affordable Technologies

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April 22, 2011

8:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Katz Building

The Future is Global Education: A Panel Discussion

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April 21, 2011

3:00pm - 5:00pm, The Nittany Lion Inn

Reception to follow, 5:00pm - 6:00pm

Leaders in various international initiatives at Penn State will discuss the possibilities and challenges that globalizing trends present to faculty and students in institutions of higher education, and to offer creative ways that the PSU community can address them. Ultimately our goal is to consider how PSU can lead the future of global education.

Hot Politics: Film Screening and Discussion on the Science and Politics of Global Warming

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April 20, 2011

7:00 p.m.

Katz Auditorium

Why has the U.S. government failed to join in climate change agreements adopted by much of the rest of the world? In honor of Earth Day, the School of International Affairs will host an event focused on this question featuring a film screening and discussion moderated by renowned Penn State researcher, Donald A. Brown.

K-12 Curriculum developed for Hot Politics: Examining the politics behind the U.S. government's failure to act on the biggest environmental problem of our time is hosted by Frontline, PBS.

Symposium: Rhetoric, Violence, Representation

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April 15, 2011

9:00am - Noon, 2:00pm - 5:00pm

Participants include Megan Foley, Greg Goodale, Josh Gunn, Peter Hitchcock, Joseph Slaughter, Nathan Stormer, Brad Vivian, and Zahi Zalloua.

Writing the Americas, Writing World Literature

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April 11, 2011

6:30pm - 8:30pm, Nittany Lion Inn Alumni Lounge

Symposium with guest speakers Luisa Valenzuela, João Almino, and Zulfikar Ghose.

Disasters in Japan: a Community Discussion

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April 11, 2011

Reception 6:30 - 7:00 p.m.

Panel 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Greg Sutliff Auditorium, Katz Building

This discussion, moderated by Dr. John Kelmelis, will look at the impact and the implications of disasters in Japan from a variety of perspectives. Panelists include Dr. Charles Ammon, Dr. Gregory Smits, Dr. Arthur Motta, and Dr. Yumiko Watanabe.

To view the webcast of Disasters in Japan, you may need to download Microsoft SilverLight Player.

The Gauntlet: Seeking to Redress Environmental Injustice Through Hip-Hop

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April 7, 2011

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

112 Kern Building

The purpose of this event is to raise awareness and initiate dialogue on environmental justice issues that disproportionately and unjustly impact minority groups globally. Guest speaker will be journalist, activist, and political analyst Bakari Kitwana.

Film Co-Productions, Spatial Practice, and the Cultural Contingencies of 'New Asia'

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April 5, 2011

12:20pm - 1:25pm, 102 Kern Building

A lecture by Stephanie DeBoer of Indiana University.

Harmony: A New Way of Looking at Our World

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March 30, 2011

7:00pm, State Theater

Featuring the winners of the 2010 Rock Ethics Institute short film competition, and a Q-and-A session with director Stuart Sender and Todd Paglia, Executive director of ForestEthics.

Competing Imperatives of Cultural Translation: Status, Space, Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics

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March 23, 2011

4:30pm - 5:30pm, Foster Auditorium

A lecture by Azade Seyhan (Bryn Mawr College)

Possibilities and Limitations in Global Health

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March 18-19, 2011

7:00pm, Berg Auditorium

Symposium: Majoritizing Minority Literatures Through Translation

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March 17-18, 2011

March 17: 6:30pm - 8:30pm, Foster Auditorium

March 18: 8:30am - 5:45pm, 402 Burrowes Building

This symposium brings together writers, readers, translators, editors, and literary scholars to celebrate the presence of world literature in translation in the United States, and to discuss a crucial aspect of the development and current status of the world republic of letters – the majoritizing of minor literatures through translation. “Minority” refers here both to literary cultures that make use of languages without the superregional resonance enjoyed by English, French, Spanish, and a few other languages, to those that exist in an imbalance vis à vis a related dominant culture (Portuguese vs. Spanish; Ukrainian vs. Russian), but also to the underrepresentation of nearly any non-English literature in the marketplace of US publishing. To “majoritize” such literatures means to integrate their richnesses into the wealth of cultural production and consumption in North America.

Papers: Stories of Undocumented Youth

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March 17, 2011

7:00pm, 116 Katz Building

A Touch of Culture: Highlights of South Asia

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Friday, March 25, 2011

6 - 9 p.m.

Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School 

A presentation of the arts, food, and culture of the countries that comprise South Asia.

Touch of Culture 2011

Arabic Literature Now: New Directions

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March 14, 2011

12:20pm - 1:25pm, 102 Kern Building

A lecture by Amal Amireh (George Mason University) and Waïl S. Hassan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Dr. Amireh is the author of The Factory Girl and the Seamstress: Imagining Gender and Class in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction (Garland, 2000), and is co-editor, with Lisa Suhair Majaj, of Going Global: The Transnational Reception of Third World Women Writers (Garland, 2000) and Etel Adnan: Critical Essays on the Arab-American Writer and Artist (McFarland, 2002).

Dr. Hassan is an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Illinois. His areas of interest include Modern Arabic, Anglophone and Francophone literatures; literary and cultural theory; gender, postcolonial, translation, and transnational studies. His publications include Tayeb Salih: Ideology and the Craft of Fiction(Syracuse University Press, 2003) and Immigrant Narratives: Orientalism and Cultural Translation in Arab-American and Arab-British Literature(Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2011).

Making Monsters: War Crimes and Ordinary Men

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February 28, 2011

12:20pm - 1:25pm, 102 Kern Building

A lecture by James Dawes (Macalester College)

James Dawes is a Professor of English and American Literature, Chair of the Macalester College English Department, and the Founder and Director of the Program in Human Rights and Humanitarianism. Some of his published work includes That the World May Know: Bearing Witness to Atrocity (Harvard University Press, 2007) and The Language of War (Harvard University Press, 2002)

Professor Dawes’s visit is a part of the series “Violence, Conflict, and Dialogue: Perspectives on Global Communication,” sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Latin American Studies program, the Department of Spanish Italian & Portuguese, the Social Thought Program, The Rock Ethics Institute, the Center for Democratic Deliberation, and the Center for American Literary Studies. Throughout the spring semester, various speakers will be invited to Penn State to present interdisciplinary views on this broad topic.

Yucatan in Pennsylvania Roundtable

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February 24, 2011

Noon - 6:00pm, 102 Weaver Building

Part of the "Latin American Worlds" Speaker Series and the "Violence, Conflict, and Dialogue" Series, this event will include talks by Penn State scholars Matthew Restall, Amara Solari, Erick Rochette, and Spencer Delbridge, as well as visiting scholars Joanne Baron (U Penn), Sarah Kurnick (U Penn), Mark Christensen (Assumption College), Rajeshwari Dutt (Carnegie Mellon University), Richard Leventhal (U Penn), Paul Eiss (Carnegie Mellon), Elizabeth Durden (Bucknell), David Sowell (Juniata College), and Christa Cesario (U Penn).

Trauma as Durational Performance: A Walk Through Villa Grimaldi with Pedro Matta

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February 21, 2011

12:20pm - 1:25pm, 102 Kern Building

A lecture by Diana Taylor (NYU)

Diana Taylor is a Professor of Performance Studies and Spanish at NYU, and the Founding Director of The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics. Some of her recent works include Disappearing Acts: Spectacles of Gender and Nationalism in Argentina’s ‘Dirty War’ (Duke U.P., 1997) and The Archive and the Repertoire: Performing Cultural Memory in the Americas (Duke U.P., 2003) which won the ATHE Research Award in Theatre Practice and Pedagogy and the Modern Language Association Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize for the best book in Latin American and Spanish Literatures and Culture (2004). She is editor of Stages of Conflict: A Reader in Latin American Theatre and Performance (2008, Michigan U. P.) and co-editor of Holy Terrors: Latin American Women Perform (2004, Duke U.P.), among others.

Professor Taylor’s visit is a part of the series “Violence, Conflict, and Dialogue: Perspectives on Global Communication,” sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Latin American Studies program, the Department of Spanish Italian & Portuguese, the Social Thought Program, The Rock Ethics Institute, the Center for Democratic Deliberation, and the Center for American Literary Studies. Throughout the spring semester, various speakers will be invited to Penn State to present interdisciplinary views on this broad topic.

Testimonio (testimonial narrative) and Truth

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February 7, 2011

12:30pm - 1:25pm, 102 Kern Building

A lecture by John Beverley (University of Pittsburgh)

John Beverley is a Professor of Spanish and Latin American Literature and Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, with particular expertise in the literature of the Golden Age, Hispanic and Latin American baroque, Latin American cultural studies, Testimonio writings, Spanish and Latin American film, U.S. Latino literature, and postcolonial and subaltern studies. He is a founding member of both the Graduate Program in Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh and the Latin American Subaltern Studies Group. Some of Professor Beverley’s publications include From Cuba (ed. 2002), La voz del otro: Testimonio, subalternidad y verdad narrativa (ed. new edition; 2002), and Subalternity and Representation, Arguments in Cultural Theory (1999).

Professor Beverley’s visit is a part of the series “Violence, Conflict, and Dialogue: Perspectives on Global Communication,” sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Latin American Studies program, the Department of Spanish Italian & Portuguese, the Social Thought Program, The Rock Ethics Institute, the Center for Democratic Deliberation, and the Center for American Literary Studies. Throughout the spring semester, various speakers will be invited to Penn State to present interdisciplinary views on this broad topic.

E A R T H . T A L K: Modeling and Managing Ecosystem Service Interactions for Resilient Social-Ecological Systems (12.6)

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December 6, 2010

4:00pm, 112 Walker Building

Elena Bennett, Department of Natural Resource Sciences and McGill School of Environment, McGill University

Mediasite contains video of these talks.

E A R T H . T A L K: Resilience Apparently: Kwihangana among Youth Heads of Household in Post-Genocide, Urban Rwanda

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November 29, 2010

4:00pm, 112 Walker Building

Maggie Zraly, Department of Anthropology, Miami University

To see a video of Dr. Zraly's talks, see Mediasite.

E A R T H . T A L K: Systems in Motion: Looking Backward to Move Forward

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November 15, 2010

4:00pm, 112 Walker Building

This Earth Talk will be given by Dr. Don Nelson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Georgia. Part of Dr. Nelson’s work focuses on community development in Brazil.

Genre and (The War of the) Discipline(s)

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November 15, 2010

12:15pm - 1:15pm, 102 Kern Building

Alastair Renfrew is the Head of the Department of Russian at Durham University, the Director of Research in the School of Modern Languages & Cultures, and Editor of the journal Slavonica.

The End of Globalization and Protective Markets: German Studies, Casualty or Opportunity?

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November 12, 2010

2:00pm, 402 Burrowes Building

Professor Willi Goetschel University of Toronto

“Embracing a post-national perspective does not entail depreciation or forsaking of literary and cultural traditions. On the contrary, enabling us to read better, read again and attend to the urgency of a different, and richer protocol that heeds the exigencies of the day will allow us to re-open the books and the world of letters that are now no longer subject to the dictate of national appropriation.”

–from Professor Goetschel’s 2009 Craig Lecture, “German Studies in a Post-National Age”

Conquest-Era Yucatan through the Lens of Art History

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October 27, 2010

6:00pm, 102 Weaver Building

Cody Barteet

Assistant Professor, Department of Visual Arts

The University of Western Ontario

John Labatt Visual Arts Centre

Expanding Sustainability: Rights, Global Economics, and Human Transformation

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October 26, 2010

Noon - 1:30pm, 124 Sparks Building

A Public Talk with Chilean Environmental Economist, Diplomat and Spiritual Teacher Alfredo Sfeir-Younis.

A Brown Bag Lunch Talk with drinks and dessert provided.

Sponsored by the Center for Sustainability and the Center for Global Studies

"It is impossible to attain the aims of a sustainable civilization without agreeing on a bundle of rights, be it for this generation or future generations. Sustainable Development embodies a social contract which must unfold from a vision and a set of human values that prove essential to human transformation in our global reality." -Alfredo Sfeir-Younis

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