2012 - 2013

The Teaching Japan Workshop

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Friday, May 10, 2013

8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

129A Hetzel Union Building

Robeson Center

University Park, PA

Registration is free and open to local K-12 educators as well as graduate and undergraduate students in the College of Education. Act 48 Hours are available. All meals on the 10th are included and free lodging in State College for the evenings of the 9th and the 10th. View The Teaching Japan Workshop.

8th Annual Turkish Night

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Friday, May 3, 2013

6:00 p.m.

Young Scholars Of Central PA Charter School

1530 Westerly Pkwy, State College

You are cordially invited to come and join us at the Turkish Night! We will have bounce house, fun games, Turkish food (doner kebab/gyro, baklava, etc.), Grand Bazaar, and wonderful cultural performances. We will also have door prizes and gifts during the program. Thanks to generous funding from the Center for Global Studies, there will be no admission fee. You can purchase a meal ticket for $3.

The Nerds, Wonks, and Neo-Cons symposium

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Monday, April 29, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Geographies of Power: Justice, Revolution, and the Cultural Imagination

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Friday, April 26, 2013 - Saturday, April 27, 2013

The Nittany Lion Inn

Using historical analysis and cross-cultural awareness, this conference will emphasize shifting geographies of power in the period between the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and the 2011 Arab Spring. The project is premised on the idea that “the frontiers of cultural understanding” are undergoing a transformation that can only be appreciated through a cross-cultural perspective and a multi-disciplinary methodology that is alert to the historical precedents behind current geopolitical and cultural conflicts.

This conference is being conducted with support from the Worldwide University Network (WUN), a consortium of 18 research universities from five continents. Additional support is provided by the Center for Global Studies, College of Liberal Arts, the School of International Affairs, the Confucius Institute, the Rock Ethics Institute, the International Center for the Study of Terrorism, the Center for Democratic Deliberation, the Department of History, the Department of Compartive Literature, The Department of Political Science, and the University Office of Global Programs. View Geographies of Power: Justice, Revolution, and the Cultural Imagination.

View the Geographies of Power: Justice, Revolution, and the Cultural Imagination page.

Emotion vs. Strategy: On the New Media Experience of Space

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Marie-Laura Ryan, Independent Scholar

Monday, April 22, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

The Human Cost of India’s Race Towards Becoming a Developed Nation

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Priyanka Borpujari, independent journalist and photographer

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Room 201, State College Borough (243 S. Allen St)

5:00 p.m. 

Friday, April 19, 2013

Room 321, the HUB-Robeson Center

6:00 p.m.

Meet and Greet

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Priyanka Borpujari, independent journalist and photographer

Friday, April 19, 2013

Webster’s Bookstore and Café (133 E Beaver Ave)

2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Smeal International Night

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Room 110, Business Building 

6:00 - 9:00 p.m. 

International Night serves to help undergraduates from all majors and backgrounds to learn more about international opportunities. In light of social and political differences, our distinguished guests will elaborate on particular hardships they have faced while working internationally. 

The speakers will highlight international business through their many years of personal experience. Through both formal speaking and casual conversation after the event, International Night serves to highlight their commitment to international business and to the greater Penn State community.

Fighting Health Care Privatization in El Salvador

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Ivonne Olmedo, Executive Board Member of the Bloom Hospital Workers’ Union (SITHBLOOM)

Tuesday, April 16, 2013 

Room 502, Keller Building

12:45 - 2:00 p.m. 

Black Women and the New Pornography

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Ariane Cruz, Penn State

Monday, April 15, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Maritime Frontiers in Asia: Indigenous Communities and State Control in South China and Southeast Asia, 2000 BCE – 1800 CE

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Friday, April 12 - Saturday, April 13, 2013 

Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

This conference provides a platform for discussing maritime frontier zones in premodern China and Southeast Asia. Specialists from around the globe will convene to examine the historical and archaeological records of South China and Southeast Asia as part of a single cosmopolitan trade network, referred to by recent scholars as the “maritime silk road,” or the “Jiaozhi Ocean trade network.” In particular, this conference highlights techniques of state control in conjunction with local ways of avoiding, inverting, or adapting to such techniques in the regional cultures of the South China Sea. The main mega-group under examination will be the various peoples who inhabited the frontier zones of what is now China and Vietnam. Other peoples, such as Taiwanese (aboriginals and Min-nan), Japanese, Cham, Khmer, Indian, Muslim, and European peoples will also enter into our discussions, adding an even greater comparative, transnational perspective and demonstrating the strategic importance of this region throughout history.

Funding is provided by the American Council of Learned Society/Chiang Ching-kuo “Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Society” conference Grant, Penn State’s Asian Studies, and Penn State’s Center for Global Studies.

Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) in Malaysia: The Way Forward 

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Awang Noor Abd. Ghani, Universit Putra Malaysia 

Friday, April 12, 2013 

402 Burrowes, 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Dr. Awang Noor Abd. Ghani is an associate professor in the Faculty of Forestry at the Universiti Putra Malaysia. Dr. Ghani's presentation is based on his stock taking exercise which was conducted last year for the Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Prime Minister Department. It highlights the concept of PES, the current status of PES in Malaysia, the legal framework, and the way forward. 

Bring your lunch and join us. Coffee, Tea, and cookies will be provided.

The Pietà di Palestrina: A Sculpture's Story from Michelangelo to Mussolini

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Pierette Kulpa, Art History, Penn State

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

206 Burrowes, 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

The Pietà di Palestrina, an unfinished marble sculpture group in the Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence, was, from 1756 to the mid-1960s, celebrated as one of the late masterpieces of the great Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564). But on the eve of the 400th anniversary of Michelangelo’s death the sculpture was internationally “de-attributed.” Since then the Pietà has been an overlooked orphan, ignored and dejected, despite its ability to shed light on major moments in Italian history. Sculptural trends and patronage practices of the family to first own the sculpture, the Barberini, will be explored for what they tell us about the reputation of Michelangelesque sculpture after that artist’s death. The modern life of the sculpture is a tragic one starting with its abrupt removal in Palestrina, its display at the Circus Maximus, and the role of Italian fascists in manipulating the original meaning of the sculpture. Pierette’s talk will trace the origins of the sculpture up to the present day and come to terms with what the sculpture can tell us about its changing uses through time.

Pierette Kulpa is an advanced doctoral student in the Department of Art History at Penn State. The research for her dissertation has been supported by a grant from the Center for Global Studies, a Waddell Biggart fellowship and a Committee for Early Modern Studies Junior Scholar Fellowship at the Institute for Arts and Humanities. Her research interests include Fascist appropriation of art in Italy and the history of Michelangelo’s style and techniques.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

U.S. Government Employment: "Need to Know" Information to be Successful

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Greg Sutliff Auditorium, Lewis Katz Building, 6:00p.m.

Join Clare Seelke, former Presidential Management Fellow and current specialist on Mexico, Bolivia, and El Salvador to the Cngressional Research service, for her presentation on acheiving employment success in the U.S. Government.

This lecture is co-sponsored by The Pennsylvania State University, School of Interational Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

De-Radicalizing the Taliban’s Child Militants: A View from Swat Valley

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John Horgan, Penn State

Wednesday, April 3, 2013 

Alumni Fireside Lounge, Nittany Lion Inn, 5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Pakistan’s Swat Valley and the brutal legacy of the Taliban’s recruitment of child militants will be the focus of a talk by Dr. John Horgan, director of the International Center for the Study of Terrorism (ICST) at Penn State. The event will be held from 5-6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3, in the Alumni Fireside Lounge at the Nittany Lion Inn on Penn State’s University Park campus. Horgan’s talk, titled “De-Radicalizing the Taliban’s Child Militants: A View from Swat Valley,” is free and open to the public. 

Horgan and fellow ICST researcher Dr. Mia Bloom recently returned from a trip to Swat Valley. Beginning in 2007, the valley’s inhabitants were victim to a brutal reign of terror from the Pakistani Taliban, leaving a legacy of trauma to the region since the Pakistani Army’s offensive in 2009 to rid the region of Taliban control. The primary purpose of Horgan and Bloom’s trip to Pakistan was to visit Sabaoon, a rehabilitation center for child militants who once belonged to the Taliban. Horgan will describe the children’s day-to-day life in the Taliban, as well as the challenges faced by workers at Sabaoon to de-radicalize the children and discourage re-engagement with the terrorist group. 

Dr. John Horgan, ICST Director, is associate professor of psychology in the College of the Liberal Arts at Penn State and author of more than 60 publications. His books include “Divided We Stand: The Strategy and Psychology of Ireland’s Dissident Terrorists” (2013), “The Psychology of Terrorism” (2005), and “Walking Away from Terrorism: Accounts of Disengagement from Radical and Extremist Movements” (2009). He is a member of multiple editorial boards and the Research Advisory Board of the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime (NCAVC). He holds a Ph.D. in applied psychology from University College, Cork, in Ireland.

This lecture is a part of the International Center for the Study of Terrorism Lecture Series.

Disappearing History: Scenes of Trauma in the Theater of Human Rights (a Reading of Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden)

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Cathy Caruth, Cornell

Monday, April 1, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Extraterritoriality and the Construction of International Governance Frameworks for Business and Human Rights

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Nabih Haddad, School of International Affairs, Penn State

Wednesday, March 27, 2013 

430 Burrowes, 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Over the last decade, two international institutions — the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) — have crafted frameworks for the governance of the human rights impacts of international business activities. In both cases, the focus has been on creating international standards above national law. Yet, both systems also provide a space for the assertion of national law beyond the territorial limits of states, at least under certain circumstances. But the assertion of extraterritorial power has been controversial for a century or more.

Nabih Haddad is a master’s candidate at the School of International Affairs (SIA) focusing on institutional analysis, post-secondary education, and transnational governance. He's also a visiting graduate research assistant at The National Forum on Higher Education for the Public Good, affiliated with the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Nabih’s research interests focus on variety of topics, relating to organizational behavior within post-secondary education, student access, human rights, governance, and philanthropy. Nabih is a native of Michigan and has earned his B.A. in political science, with a minor in psychology, from Wayne State University.  While at SIA, he has studied under Professor Larry Catá Backer researching the organizational effects of transnational actors in regards to international law and policy, as well as being an associate editor for the Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs (JLIA).

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

Of Maps and Mannequins: Dung Kai Cheung, Hong Kong, and the Logic of the Fetish

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Carlos Rojas, Duke

Monday, March 25, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

International Symposium: Global Workers' Rights, Patterns of Exclusion Possibilities for Change

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Keynote: "The Precariat: Building Occupational Citizenship" 

Guy Standing, Professor in Development Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

Wednesday, March 20, 2013 

101 Chambers Building, 7:15 p.m. 

Symposium Panels 

Thursday, March 20, 2013 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. 

Friday, March 21, 2013 9:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Penn State Room, Nittany Lion Inn

Members of the Center for Global Workers' Rights (CGWR) will host scholars, activists, and labor practitioners from various parts of the world focusing on the growing trend toward worker precarity. The aim of this symposium is to discuss existing strategies and propose alternative ways to overcome associated insecurities while seeking approaches that might help promote worker empowerment.

This event is co-sponsored by PSU Center for Global Studies and Latin American Studies Program.

The Suvivability Project

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Vincent Bruyere, Penn State

Wednesday, March 20, 2013 

430 Burrowes, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

"It is time for a reality check and this time is now. There is indeed a certain tone of seriousness adopted by the humanities that ought to be taken seriously; seriously as in part of a research project and knowing that one cannot be serious unless we try on the jouissance of our sublime ending. This is that ever receding present that the Survivability Project intends to plot out. Perhaps because it succeeds in readjusting logics of inquiry to demands for meaning, policy relevance is one of these try outs. As such, it is something whose historicity as object of discourse and object of desire cannot leave literary scholars indifferent. By way of example, I attend to a call for reservation. Reading in Rabelais’s Fourth Book the episode of the “frozen words”, what I propose to do is to raise policy relevance to the dignity of the Thing that puts in motion the distinction between fables and serious talks, history and fiction, play and liability."

Vincent Bruyere is an assistant professor in the department of French and Francophone Studies at Penn State. His first book, The Francophone Difference - From Jean de Léry to Patrick Chamoiseau was published (in French) in 2012. This lecture is hosted by the Center for Global Studies.

Public Privacies: Forms of Self and Nation in Recent South African Autobiography

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Gabeba Baderoon, Penn State

Monday, March 18, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Linguistic Detective Work: Using circumstantial and “fingerprint" evidence to solve the mystery of Palenquero's grammar

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Hiram Smith, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, Penn State

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

430 Burrowes, 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Creoles are languages that take their grammar and lexicon from two or more languages, often a colonial language and one of African origin. Until recently, many believed creole languages to be bastardized forms of European vernaculars. Recent linguistic research on creole languages has revealed that, despite having “mixed” grammars, internal language change takes place in these languages in the same manner as has been found for other languages of the world. 

Hiram Smith is currently developing research in the Afro-Hispanic community of San Basilio de Palenque, Colombia. His doctoral dissertation examines two enigmatic grammatical forms (one nominal and one verbal) in the Spanish-based creole called Palenquero, in order to determine their origins. 

This presentation contributes to the documentation of languages in the African diaspora, which have been socially stigmatized, and to demonstrating their systematicity in the structure of linguistic variation. It will also consider some of the more general issues in creole studies and studies on African American vernacular English.

Hiram Smith is a graduate student of linguistics in the Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese at Penn State. His research interests include sociolinguistics, language variation and change, pidgin and creole languages, African American Vernacular English, and placing language in its social and historical contexts. 

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

Talking about Chinese Poetry in Modern Japan

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Matthew Fraleigh, Brandeis University

Monday, March 11, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Personhood and the Subliminal Mind: Yogacara Buddhism versus Freud

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Tao Jiang, Rutgers University

Monday, February 25, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Chimera of Correspondence

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Eduardo Cadava, Princeton 

Monday, February 18, 2013 

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

The Birth of Spanish American Fantastic Fiction

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José Álvarez, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, Penn State

Wednesday, February 13, 2013 

430 Burrowes, 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Many complementary and contradictory definitions of the fantastic have been circulating in the academia since the publication of Tzvetan Todorov’s Introduction à la littérature fantastique in 1970. These academic debates often forget that the origins and possibilities of the genre were theorized in very similar terms by Jorge Luis Borges, Adolfo Bioy Casares, and Silvina Ocampo thirty years earlier, in a controversial and widely read collection entitled Antología de la literatura fantástica (1940). This presentation focuses on the peculiar definition of the fantastic proposed by these Argentinean writers in 1940, analyzing the political, cultural, and social circumstances in which they declare the birth of the new genre, and discussing the specific agenda behind such project.

José Álvarez is an ABD doctoral student in Spanish. He has taught a wide variety of language and literature classes in his native country Peru, and in Penn State, where he is currently working as a course supervisor for the Intermediate Spanish Language Program. His research focuses on contemporary Spanish American literature and British Gothic fiction. He is in the process of turning his recently-defended dissertation into a book, The Gothic Tradition in Spanish America. He is also working on an essay on Ricardo Piglia’s La ciudad ausente.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Digital Tools/Early Modern Books

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Sarah Werner, Folger Shakespeare Library

Monday, February 11, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Translating Calligraphy

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Abé Markus Nornes, Michigan

Monday, February 4, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

What Do Employers Want?

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013 

309 Sparks, 7:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Wondering what employers look for when reviewing job applications?  Attend this panel discussion to learn about how to make your application stand out from the pack!  Panelists include representatives from Northwestern Mutual, Penn State Admissions, Penn State Justice and Safety Institute, Center for Global Studies, UPMC, and Whiting Turner.

Panelists:

Jesse Beam, Whiting Turner

Joe DeStefano, Penn State Justice and Safety Institute

Sarah Lyall-Combs, Penn State Center for Global Studies

Sammi Soriano, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)

Jenna Spinelle, Penn State Admissions

Clare Yannella, Northwestern Mutual Financial Network

A Globalized Criminal World: The blurred line between terrorist organizations and transnational criminal organizations 

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Matthew Ceccato, School of International Affairs, Penn State

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 

430 Burrowes, 1:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.

Since the attacks on September 11, terrorism has been the primary national security focus of the United States and its allies. Extensive interagency cooperation, expanded budgets and emerging technology have offered a degree of success in combating terrorism. However, terrorist organizations have begun to transition and partner with various transnational criminal organizations to remain clandestine, finance operations and improve their networks. This shift has created hybrid organizations that blur the lines between terrorism and criminal organizations, which have been able to operate under the radar and out of the control of governments. Using historical examples and current groups in operation, this talk will focus on the reasons why terrorist groups and criminal organizations partner together. Also, the talk will offer new definitions that can be used to define the hybrid groups and methods to confront them.

Matthew Ceccato is a second year master's candidate in the School of International Affairs at Penn State. His area of study focuses on national security, intelligence and terrorism. Matthew received his Bachelor of Arts degree in International/Intercultural Communications from California State University, Sacramento. He served in the Army and was deployed twice to Iraq before becoming medically retired after being wounded in combat. Matthew has had numerous internships, notably at the US Army War College in Carlisle, PA where he assisted in the formulation of international policing policy and the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

Russian-American Literature in the 21st Century: The Sequel

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Adrian Wanner, Penn State

Monday, January 28, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Teaching World Culture Through The Visual Arts K-12 Teachers Workshop

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Friday, January 18, 2013

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

State College High School

North Building, Room 303

The Center for Global Studies at Penn State is pleased to offer an Act 48 professional development workshop for practicing K-12 classroom teachers focusing on the teaching of world culture through the visual arts. For more details, refer to the workshop program.

World Stories Alive! Tales in Many Tongues

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Saturdays starting January 12, 2013

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Schlow Library, State College

February 9 Farsi (Persian)
February 16 Hindi
February 23 Turkish
March 2 & 9 No sessions
March 16 Portuguese
March 23 No session
March 30 Hebrew
April 6 Korean
April 13 Russian

Alumnus Career Panel: African Development and Career Opportunities

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Jinghao Lu

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

114 Katz Building, University Park

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

Penn State graduate Jinghao Lu leads discussion on working experience in African development, internship and job opportunities, best career advice, and more.

Jinghao Lu is an Analyst of China-Africa Desk of the Johannesburg-based capital advisory firm, Frontier Advisory, in South Africa. He has been assisting in providing research report and strategy advisory to Chinese and South African multinationals with regard to their emerging market strategy. 

As a Schreyer Honors Scholar at Penn State University, Jinghao received a Master of International Affairs and a B.A. in sociology (with economics minor) at the same time in December, 2011. Jinghao's academic focus is China-Africa economic relationship. In 2009 and 2011, he went to Ghana (West Africa) and conducted his thesis research on the Chinese corporate social responsibilities (CSR) in Africa. Outside the classroom, Jinghao was an active student leader in several student organizations, serving as President of International Student Council at Penn State.

Jinghao was born and has lived in Shanghai, China for 19 years. He is fluent in both Mandarin and English, and is now learning Portuguese. He has lived or travelled in over 10 countries in Asia, North America and Africa.

This session is organized by the School of International Affairs and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the International Law Society, and Schreyer Honors College.

Professor Latino goes to Singapore: Race, Classical Reception, and Canonicity in 16th century Granada and 21st century Singapore

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Mira Seo, Yale-NUS

Monday, December 3, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Fostering Student Global Engagement through Academic Advising: a professional development seminar for academic advisers at Penn State

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Friday, November 30, 2012

10:00 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

110 Henderson Building (The Living Center)

Presented by the Divison of Undergraduate Studies with a grant from the Bringing Theory to Practice Project of the Association of American Colleges and Universities and additional support from the Center for Global Studies and Penn State World Campus.

Resources from this seminar are available at https://dus.psu.edu/fostering-student-global-engagement-through-academic-advising.

Maya Prophecy: From Conquest to Final Days

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Paul Sullivan, Author of Xuxub Must Die: The Lost Histories of a Murder on the Yucatan

Thursday, November 29, 2012

102 Weaver Building, 5 p.m.

Boren Fellowship Program Informational Session

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Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Auditorium, Katz Building, University Park

7 p.m.

Join Amy Ruttenberg, Boren Program Manager, to learn more about the application process for the 2013-14 Boren Scholar and Fellow awards.

This session is organized by the School of International Affairs Office of International Career Services and supported by the Center for Global Studies, the College of Liberal Arts Career Enrichment Network, and the Office of Graduate Fellowships and Awards Administration.

How to Read Lolita

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Imraan Coovadia, University of Cape Town

Monday, November 26, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Go Global: International Job Search Fundamentals

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

5:30 - 7:00 p.m. 

129 Waring

International Careers Expert and Author Stacie Berdan will discuss:

• Global skills needed to compete in a competitive global workplace

• Building a global résumé

• Leveraging language study and study-abroad experience in the job search

• Practicalities of working internationally.

Milking the Rhino: Innovative Solutions Showcase

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Wednesday, November 14, 2012

HUB Auditorium, 6:30 - 8:00 p.m.

Inspired by the documentary Milking The Rhino, Penn State has created the Innovative Solutions Showcase for students from all majors as a venue to foster critical thinking about sustainable community development, developmental entrepreneurship, and the role of technology in enabling new solutions to global inequities. We want students to explore the ethical intricacies of globalization and loss of indigenous cultures, and the role technology plays in fostering and hurting sustainable self-determined development. 

Student teams from across the world are invited to articulate their understanding of the challenges faced by indigenous communities in Africa with regard to wildlife and natural resource management, conservation, and sustainability.  The teams will then draw from their academic areas to conceptualize and effectively communicate innovative and sustainable solutions to empower indigenous people and foster development by leveraging local resources. Students will prepare three-minute video pitches which will be rated by a five-member interdisciplinary panel of referees. The mechanics and logistics of the showcase, important dates and resources are presented on this website.

Milking the Rhino Documentary Screening

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Wednesday, November 14, 2012

HUB Auditorium at Penn State, preceding the showcase

Milking the Rhino is a documentary that explores the complex relationships between people and wildlife in sub-Saharan Africa. It provides the context for students to develop appropriate, innovative and sustainable solutions to empower indigenous communities to leverage natural resources for self-determined development in Africa.

An Ethical Horror: Political Subtext in Early Sound Films During the Rise of Fascism

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Jeff Resta, Comparative Literature, Penn State

Wednesday, November 14, 2012 

402 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

In Fritz Lang’s M, Jean Renoir’s La Nuit du Carrefour and Tod Browning’s Freaks, the exaggerated naturalist terrors of madness, mob mentality and torture became elaborate metaphors for the widespread intellectual dread of fascist revolution.

A scant decade after the most devastating war in history, sound film became a practical reality. A mass-media vehicle of previously unknown saturation, it allowed the dissemination of complex rhetoric to the widest possible audience, in the guise of entertainment. This period of intense cinematic creativity and discovery coincided with the rise of fascism in Western Europe. 

Alongside Gothic horror, a new mode of terror developed. Directors in this Naturalist mode - a proto-film-noir embracing mystery, thriller, and black-comedy genres - were keenly aware of the supernatural Christian foundations of Gothic horror, and borrowed freely from its trappings. Terror cinema, however, was much more ethically complex than Gothic horror cinema. It grew out of a deep cultural skepticism to the binary opposition of religious faith and scientific reason in accounting for good and evil.

Jeff Resta is an ABD doctoral student in Comparative Literature, with a focus on 20th-century world drama and film. He has taught as an exchange lecturer at the University of Strasbourg, France, and currently conducts after-school classes in World Mythology at the Young Scholars of Central Pennsylvania Charter School. His dissertation examines the politics of popular horror in the early 20th century, and especially the role of horror genres in the development of a simplified, humanist concept of good and evil without reference to the supernatural.

Before returning to graduate school, Jeff was a playwright affiliated with Annex Theatre Company in Seattle, specializing in darkly comic drama on sociopolitical themes. In addition to numerous Seattle venues, Jeff’s plays have been produced at the Theatre of Puget Sound; at Whitman College’s Harper-Joy Theatre; by Performers Under Stress theatre company in San Francisco; by Albuquerque Children’s Theatre; as part of an “email-plays” installation at the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville; at La Tea Theatre in Manhattan, as part of the New York City Fringe Festival; and at the Center for Contemporary Arts in Glasgow, Scotland.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Indigenous People's Rights: A Historical and Contemporary Global Movement

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Judy Bertonazzi and Julie Rowland

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

3:15 - 5:00 p.m.

Foster Auditorium

This joint presentation by Julie Rowland and Judy Bertonazzi will describe circumstances leading to the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and will highlight some of the legal issues and conflicts that may be involved in the implementation of a UN Declaration that is supported by the executive branch of the U.S. government, but has not been ratified by Congress. The presentation will emphasize Native American rights. A commentary from the perspective of Native American in the US will be provided by Connie FileSteel.

Song of the Vikings: Snorri and the Making of Norse Myths

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Nancy Marie Brown, Author

Monday, November 12, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Hermeneutics of the Cart: Dual subjectivities of the Contemporary French Lancelot

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Cédric Briand, Department of French and Francophone Studies, Penn State

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 

430 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

The construction of Lancelot’s masculinity has been a complex process. Beginning with Chrétien de Troyes’s 12th-century Le Chevalier de la Charrette, Lancelot has had to struggle between two antagonistic gendering models: that of chivalry, and that of fin'amors. The later, 13th-century prose VulgateCycle complicates things further. Lancelot’s holy quest for the Grail is compromised by various agents of authority, who impose on him a multiplicity of often incompatible codes of behavior. 

This intricate web of conflicting identities has resulted in many faces for Lancelot in contemporary pop culture. Suddenly ugly and in love with Arthur in T.H White’s The Ill-Made Knight, he also becomes the bearer of the rainbow flag in the Musical Spamalot. But the French, too, have resurgences to offer. After discussing Chrétien's cart scene, I will show how the subjective dualities of the character operate in three different French media: through the duality of Lancelot's name in René Barjavel's final novel, L’Enchanteur (1984); through the duality of his allegiances in Alexandre Astier's successful TV series Kaamelott (2005-2009); and finally, through the duality of his sex in the eponymous bande dessinée, Lancelot (2008-present). Transcending the incongruity of approaches these sources have to offer, I will contend that Lancelot’s inconsistencies serve to highlight an ambiguous subjectivity.

CGS Fellow Cédric Briand is a doctoral candidate in the French and Francophone Studies currently working on his dissertation, "Hermeneutics of the Charrette", in which he studies the subjective (de)constructions of Lancelot in the French medieval corpus. His research interests include questions of masculinity, sexuality, subjectivity and their conflicting interactions. He has been a visiting exchange at Brown University and at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, earned an M.A. in English Studies from the Université de Bourgogne in Dijon, and, more recently, an M.A. in French and Francophone Studies at Penn State.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on the graduate research across disciplinary fields.

Thick Skin, Thin Mask: The Dilemma of Chinese Opera in the New Millennium

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Daphne Lei, University of California, Irvine

Monday, November 5, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Turkish Night at Penn State

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Friday, October 26

Heritage Hall, HUB

Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for dinner (ticket purchase required);

FREE admission after 8:15 p.m.

The CGS is once again pleased to support Turkish Night at Penn State. Join friends and members of the Turkish community in celebration of Republic Day. Be a part of the festivities and enjoy authentic Turkish cuisine and performances!

Comparing Surgery Literatures: Sex Reassignment Surgery in Thailand

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Jillana Enteen, Northwestern University

Monday, October 22, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

CGS booth at Bellefonte Fall Festival

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Sunday, October 21, 2012

Talleyrand Park, 1 - 4:30 p.m.

The CGS booth will showcase mehndi, the art of henna design. Visitors will have the opportunity to create their own designs on paper and have them interpreted in henna.

Empowering Women in a Changing World

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Gillian Sorenson, Senior Advisor at the United Nations Foundation 

Monday, October 22, 2012 

Foster Auditorium, 11:30 p.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Ms. Sorensen will discuss the current efforts to empower women across the globe, and the role of the UN in such efforts in the areas of health, security, education, and opportunities. It is important to understand how such efforts are affected by politics and culture, as well as the historical circumstances surrounding women’s empowerment in countries around the world. Ms. Sorensen will touch on the work of UN Women, uniting prior offices around women’s issues, as well as that of UNFPA, UN Development Programme, peacekeeping efforts and the impact of war and conflict on women, in addition to the plight of refugee women. The UN Foundation’s work to support women and girls globally – through projects such as Every Woman Every Child – are also significant efforts to empower women in a changing world.

The Arab Spring and Democracy

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Juan Cole, Michigan 

Friday, October 19, 2012

026 Hosler, 4:30 - 6:00 p.m. 

This lecture will focus on the dynamics, politics and relationship between the Arab Spring uprisings and democracy.

A public intellectual, prominent blogger and essayist, Cole is the Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan. As a commentator on Middle Eastern affairs, he has appeared in print and on television and has testified before the U.S. Senate.

The lecture is presented courtesy of the Penn State Center for Global Studies in partnership with the School of International Affairs, the World Universities Network and the Asian Studies Department.

Nuclear Disarmament: Creating a Nuclear Weapons Free Middle East

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Christine Sylvester, School of international Affairs, Penn State

Wednesday, October 17, 2012 

402 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

On August 6th and 9th 1945, two nuclear bombs were detonated over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki killing more than 100,000 people and forever changing modern warfare and the international community. The past sixty-plus years have seen the creation and use of nuclear weapons, a rapid arms race between the US and Soviet Union during the Cold War, the use of doctrines such as mutual assured destruction and deterrence, and the horizontal proliferation of weapons to now eight nations with a ninth believed to be not far off. Many efforts have been made over the past sixty years to control the proliferation of nuclear weapons. However, recent years have seen a shift in favor of using regional approaches to control proliferation. Described as nuclear weapons free zones, this tool is the next generation for controlling the spread of nuclear weapons.

Christine Sylvester’s research assesses existing treaties governing nuclear weapons free zones, including how they were developed and what each governs and protects, and then applies lessons learned from these treaties to discuss what elements would be needed in the creation of a Middle East Nuclear Weapons Free Zone.

Christine Sylvester is a master’s candidate in the School of International Affairs focusing on international security. Her research interests include nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. Prior to beginning graduate school at Penn State, Christine served as a Peace Corps Community Development Volunteer in the Eastern European Republic of Moldova and as a security and economic policy researcher for the European Parliament and British House of Commons.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Wiring Ourselves for Sound: Quietness, White Noise and the Metamorphosis of Mediated Subjectivity

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Matt Jordan, Penn State

Monday, October 15, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

CGS booth at Downtown State College Fall Festival

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

Allen Street, 10 - 3 p.m.

The CGS booth will showcase mehndi, the art of henna design. Visitors will have the opportunity to create their own designs on paper and have them interpreted in henna.

Energy, Security and Stability: Implications for Security, Prosperity and Sustainability for the United States and our Allies and Partners

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Monday, October 8, 2012

Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library, 4:00- 5:30 p.m.

The nexus of energy, security and stability will be the focus of a discussion featuring expert practitioners and policy advisers from Penn State and across the nation. The presentation will feature panelists from Penn State faculty as well as experts from the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security, the Woodrow Wilson Center, and the University of California, Irvine, among others.

The event is supported by Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment, International Center for the Study of Terrorism, Center for Global Studies, Department of History, John and Willie Leone Family Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Rock Ethics Institute, and Science, Technology and Society Program.

Recycling the Epic: Gilgamesh on Three Continents

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Wai-chee Dimock, Yale University

Monday, October 8, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Riveting Bits and Pieces: Literary and Architectural Aesthetics in the Memorial to the Abolition of Slavery of Nantes

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Sophia Khadraoui, Department of French and Francophone Studies, Penn State

Wednesday, October 3, 2012 

402 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

April 25, 2012: the Memorial to the abolition of slavery is inaugurated on the Quai de la Fosse in Nantes, France’s largest slave port in the eighteenth century. In the middle of the esplanade encrusted with 2,000 pieces of glass etched with the names and dates of Nantes’s slave ships, a large staircase leads the visitor beneath the dock. In this underground journey, the spectator discovers bits and pieces of eclectic texts –songs, poems, novels, historical testimonies and legislative texts– all engraved in an oversized glass wall. From Olympe de Gouges to Nelson Mandela to Toussaint Louverture, Martin Luther King and Bob Marley, these few lines, verses and articles compose an artistic patchwork that exhorts the spectator-actor to activate the fragmentary stimuli integrated within the memorial. By choreographing fragmentation, both on the literary and architectural levels, this memorial engages different cultures, historical figures, various languages and literary genres from four different continents and five different centuries. Beyond the history of slavery of Nantes, or even of France, it becomes a transnational, more global history of slavery that is presented to the spectator.

Sophia Khadraoui is a doctoral candidate in the French and Francophone Studies currently writing her dissertation entitled “Sculpted Memories: Commemorating the Abolition of Slavery in Metropolitan France through Monuments”. Her research interests include questions of race and identity and their repercussions in history and memory. She earned an M.A. in French and Francophone Studies from The Pennsylvania State University and another from La Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris III, in American Civilization and Postcolonial Literatures

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Biotropes: Environmental Aesthetics for an Industrial Age

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Christine Marran, University of Minnesota

Monday, October 1, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Jorge Amado and the Internationalization of Brazilian Literature

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Monday, September 24, 2012

212 Pasquerilla, 6:00 p.m.

On 24 September, Penn State will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Brazilian author Jorge Amado (1912-2001), best known for his novel Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (1966). Amado is the most translated Brazilian writer, and the literary figure who has shaped the reception of Brazilian literature in the word. He resided at Penn State for 10 weeks in the Fall semester of 1971 at the invitation of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities, making him one of the most famous writers to have visited and lectured at Penn State for an extended period.

Elizabeth Lowe, Professor of Portuguese and Director of the Director of UIUC’s Center for Translation Studies at the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, will give the keynote lecture on "Jorge Amado and the Internationalization of Brazilian Literature" from 6 - 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Lounge of the Pasquerilla Spiritual Center. Her talk will be preceded by the playing of brief excerpts from the Amado roundtables at Penn State, and brief presentations on Amado’s biography and the geography of his fiction. A reception will follow the presentations. This event is free and open to the public.

The PSU-Americanists student organization, the Departments of Comparative Literature and of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, the Program in American Literary Studies, and the College of Liberal Arts are co-sponsoring this event.

For further information and updates, please visit the Amado Centenary page at https://www.facebook.com/AmadoCentenaryPSU.

Clarice Lispector and the Art of the Crônica

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Elizabeth Lowe, University of Illinois

Monday, September 24, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

“Como una buena madre:” Neoliberal Globalization and the Mothering of the Nation in Crisis

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Luz Angelica Kirschner, Bielefeld, Germany

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

402 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

In the context of an increasingly globalized world under the dominance of neoliberal market values and so-called western culture, the appearance of religious fundamentalisms, and the radicalization of identities, the short story “Como una buena madre,” 1988, (“Like a Good Mother”) of the Jewish Argentine Ana María Shua complicate the theorization of a mestizo Latin American identity whose conceptualization traditionally has remained stuck in the unresolved dialectical tensions between the center and the periphery that have historically haunted and challenged the project of Latin American intellectuals to imagine an autochthonous Latin American identity independent from imperialist western influence.

With a nation that is still at odds with the ongoing process of democratization after the years of terror under dictatorships as a backdrop, Shua’s analysis of contemporary relationships of domination and subjugation observes that one of the most pressing phenomena affecting both Argentine men and women is globalization.

Luz Angélica Kirschner, Lecturer at the University of Bielefeld, is a visiting scholar. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, Criticism, and Aesthetics from Penn State in 2008. Her research focuses on comparative literary studies of ethnicity, race, gender, and identity formation and how these discourses have been impacted by contemporary socio-economic manifestations such as neoliberalism and globalization.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

After Midnight: Realism and the Indian Emergency

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Susan Z. Andrade, Pittsburgh 

Monday, September 17, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Gendered Lives and Livelihoods: Women's Empowerment in Appalachia and Indonesia

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Ann Tickamyer, Professor and Head, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Penn State

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Centre Furnace Mansion, 1001 E. College Avenue

Two Imaginary Medieval Universities

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Caroline Eckhardt, Penn State 

Monday, September 10, 2012

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

China after Comparison/ Comparison after China Workshop

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September 7 & 8, 2012

The workshop features short presentations by thematically organized groups of participants from the US and China, followed by extensive discussion. Our goal is as much to bring together (and build) a community of like-minded scholars as it is to work through the challenges of such things as the transnational and the transpacific, theory “and” China, world literature and Chinese studies, or the Sinophone. Workshop will be held at the Nittany Lion Inn (Friday), and Sparks 124 (Saturday)

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