2013 - 2014

Peter Van Buren, Former Foreign Service Officer and author of We Meant Well

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Thursday, May 1, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Peter Van Buren will talk about post-conflict peace-building.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

The Melodrama of the Hacienda: Luis Bunuel’s Abismos de Pasion as Postcolonial Trans/Plantation

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Kevin Hagopian, Penn State 

Monday, April 28, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Lakshman Yapa, Penn State

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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Lakshman Yapa (Geography) will talk about poverty.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Taking Your Medicine: Love Magic and the Body in Colonial Yucatán

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Rebekah Martin, Penn State

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

124 Sparks, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Love magic was a vital part of the everyday experience of disease and healing in colonial Yucatán. Maya, Afro-Yucatecan, and Spanish healers throughout the colonial period used an array of potions, powders, and other ingestibles not only to heal the sick, but also to help colonial Yucatecans attract the amorous attentions of the opposite sex. This lecture explores the variety of medicines and ingested materials used in healing and love magic by colonial Yucatecans, paying particular attention to the preparation and consumption of plant and animal materials in the practice of love magic.

Rebekah Martin is a doctoral student in the Department of History at Penn State, specializing in Colonial Latin American history. Her research focuses on the social history of medicine in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Yucatán with a special interest in Maya and Afro-Mexican healing.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Derrida the Workaholic

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Jonathan Eburne, Penn State

Monday, April 21, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Karl Hofmann, Former Ambassador, President and Chief Executive Officer of Population Service International

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Thursday, April 17, 2014 

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn)

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

College Town Film Festival 2014

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April 16, 2014 - April 19, 2014

FREE ADMISSION WITH PENN STATE ID or $5 Cash at the Door

First come, first seated.

Sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, College of Communications, College of the Liberal Arts, Communication Arts and Sciences, Department of Film/Video and Media Studies, Department of Philosophy, Department of Women’s Studies, Institute for Arts and Humanities, Office of the Provost, Paterno Fellows Program, Presidential Leadership Academy, Schreyer Honors College, and the Social Thought Program.

Re-writing Japonisme: Félix Régamey’s The Pink Notebook of Madame Chrysanthème

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Christopher Reed, Penn State

Monday, April 14, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Cathleen Campbell, President and Chief Executive Officer of CRDF Global

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Thursday, April 10, 2014

Lewis Katz Building

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Cathleen Campbell will talk about the role of science for diplomacy.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity

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William Robinson, University of California-Santa Barbara

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

124 Sparks, 5:00 p.m - 6:30 p.m

The lecture will focus on the negatives stemming from global capitalism and how it is affecting our world. According to Robinson, “The immense inequalities of the global political economy cannot easily be contained through consensual mechanisms of social control; we have been witnessing transitions from social welfare to social control states around the world.”  He argues that we are facing violent consequences of these economic disparities and will explain why during his April 9th lecture.

This lecture is sponsored by Latina/o Studies and the Center for Global Studies

China-Constitution-Politics

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Tong Zhiwei, East China Univ. of Political Science and Law

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Lewis Katz Building Auditorium, 8:30 a.m. - 3:45 p.m.

The conference will consider issues of Chinese constitutional law and politics and consider the current movement of government and popular sentiment. Featured Speakers include Professor Zhiwei Tong, one of China's most well known public intellectuals and a Professor at the East China University of Political Science and Law. Anyone interested in current developments in Chinese politics, law and culture will find the proceedings of interest.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs, the Center for Global Studies, the Center for Democratic Deliberation, the Rock Ethics Institute, and the Coalition for Peace and Ethics.

Literacy in Mobility: Negotiation of Literacies across Transnational Contexts

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Madhav Kafle, Penn State

Wednesday, April 9, 2014

124 Sparks, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Most of the research on academic literacies is based on nation-state orientation (Wimmer and Schiller) despite the reality of increasingly interdependent world. Studies based only on one’s location might not be feasible as they often fail to connect to the transnational experiences of the learners. As a part of the bigger study, this presentation explores the ways migrant students negotiate language and literacies across transnational contexts. It reports on a case study of Gyan, a Bhutanese Refugee student who negotiates literacies across diverse academic settings in both Nepal and US. Informed by literacy as a social practice, transnational literacies, and mobility, findings suggest we need to explore the connection between transnational mobility and students' multilingual repertoire as both are essential in negotiating local and global literacies in the transnational world. 

Madhav Kafle is a doctoral candidate in Applied Linguistics at The Pennsylvania State University. He has taught English in rural Nepal and currently teaches academic writing at Penn State. His research interests include multilingual writing, global spread of English, and critical pedagogy. 

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Kant, Satire, and Sexual Difference

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Surya Parekh, Penn State

Monday, April 7, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Theodore Kattouf, Former ambassador, President of AMIDEAST, and Penn State alumnus

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Thursday, April 3, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Theodore Kattouf will talk about Arab Spring.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

German Day 2014

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Wednesday, April 2, 2014

HUB Robeson Center, 10:15 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

The Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures at Penn State University invites middle school and high school German students to German Day 2014 - "Wir sind alle Ausländer - fast überall!" It will be a fun-filled day of German language activities, including a poster and movie competition, a spelling bee, poetry recitation and a German trivia game. Students will also have the opportunity to practice their German (and earn prizes!), learn more about studying German at Penn State, visit a German language class, and get a tour of campus lead by current undergraduate students. http://www.psu.edu/dept/germanday

Christ's Gripe: Sociability and Enchantment in 19th-century Vision Narratives

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Christopher Castiglia, Penn State

Monday, March 31, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Media in the Internet Age

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Sebastian Rotella, Author and Former LA Times foreign correspondent

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Memory Balloons: Algerian Comic Strips and Franco-Algerian Memory

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Sandra Rousseau, Penn State

Date: March 26, 2014

124 Sparks, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Soon after the end of the Algerian war and the birth of Algeria as a nation-state, the Algerian cultural scene bloomed.  The comic strip magazine M’Quidech published between 1960 and 1972 in both French and Arabic is a good illustration of the new art forms embraced by Algerian artists to define and display their creativity. Inspired by the events of the Algerian war and of the hundred and thirty years of colonization M’Quidech’s creators found a modern and popular media to draw not only  their memory of Franco-Algerian relations but also to set for themselves the stereotypes of Algeria and its people. I analyze how the many comic motifs displayed in M’Quidèch redefine Algeria and its relations to France taking into account the socio-political complexities which appeared as both countries were adjusting to their new ‘postcolonial’ reality.

Sandra Rousseau is a doctoral student in the department of French and Francophone studies. Her dissertation entitled “Memory’s Laughter: Franco-Algerian Relations through Humor (1954-2012)” examines how art forms such as theater, cartoons, comic strip or performances have relied on comic motifs to deal with the  traumas of Franco-Algerian relationships.  The research for her dissertation has been supported by two grants from the Center for Global Studies, Naomi A. Fischer Dissertation Enhancement Award in the College of the Liberal Arts. Her research interests include contemporary France, memory of wars, humor and popular culture.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Modernist Snark: How Fights Shaped Japanese Literature

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Alisa Freedman, University of Oregon

Monday, March 24, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

The Gender of Memory: Rural Women and China’s Disappearing Collective Past

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Gail Hershatter, University of California, Santa Cruz

Monday, March 24, 2014

Foster Auditorium, 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Intelligence and Integrity

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Paul Pillar, Former senior intelligence officer and author

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

The Boomerang Effect: Poetic Innovation and Appropriative Translation in the Americas

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Rachel Galvin, Johns Hopkins University

Monday, March 17, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Steve Mufson, Washington Post reporter covering energy, former Wall Street Journal foreign correspondent

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Thursday, March 6, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Steve Mufson will address the topic of energy.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Iran: What has Washington been thinking? And can it change 35 years of lousy policy to avert another disastrous war?

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Wednesday, March 5, 2014

22 Dieke Building

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Join Flynt Leverett and Hillary Mann Leverett as they discuss their new book, Going to Tehran. Iintroduction by Professor Sam Richards.

Sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Joe Sestak, Former Vice Admiral, Former U.S. congressman and current Bradley Chair

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Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Joe Sestak will address the issue of allocating resources for national security.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Calcutta-London-Madrid: The Politics of Translation in Global Modernisms

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Gayle Rogers, University of Pittsburgh

Monday, March 3, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Sandro Penna, Queer Intellettuale Impegnato

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John Champagne, Penn State, Erie

Monday, February 24, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Roger Thurow, Former Wall Street Journal foreign correspondent and author of The Last Hunger Season

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Roger Thurow will talk about hunger.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

The Commodification of African Diaspora Female Subjectivities: Maryse Condé’s I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

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Maha Marouan, University of Alabama

Monday, February 17,2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Faten Yasser Halawi-Ghosn, Pittsburgh

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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Faten Yasser Halawi-Ghosn, Penn State political science alumna, visiting professor at the University of Pittsburgh will talk about managing conflicts.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Mapping the Brave New World: Literary Cartographies in Socialist China, 1953-1960 

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Nicolai Volland, National University of Singapore

Monday, Februry 10, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Meredith Fensom, Lawyer and expert on Latin America

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Thursday, February 6, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Meredith Fensom will talk about protecting intellectual property.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Transnational Allegories: Intertextualizing Lu Xun in Late-Colonial Korea and Taiwan

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Satoru Hashimoto, Harvard

Monday, Feburary 3, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Peter Forster, Penn State

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Thursday, January 30, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Peter Forster, (Information Sciences and Technology) will talk about terrorism.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Cultivating Dismodernity: The Meanings of Maize and Agricultural Development in Mexico’s Central Highlands

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Emma Gaalaas Mullaney, Penn State

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

124 Sparks, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Agricultural development programs in Mexico have been consistently pushing for the replacement of traditional maize cultivars with “improved”, “modern” scientifically-bred varieties for over 70 years, and yet the overwhelming majority of Mexican maize area remains planted with farmer-bred varieties to this day. The country’s Central Highland region is home to some of the world’s foremost centers of maize research, and also to maize-cultivating peasant communities that, though oriented to commercial production, consistently decline to cultivate commercial seed in favor of diverse varieties that they have maintained for generations. Drawing on ethnographic research and oral histories with local maize farmers, agricultural extension agents, and research scientists, this talk will explore how conflicting and contextually-inflected interpretations of modernity and tradition have shaped the agricultural landscape in a region where maize is a primary source of food security, livelihood, cultural identity, and biodiversity.

Emma Gaalaas Mullaney is a dual-degree PhD Candidate in Geography and Women’s Studies. Her dissertation research has been made possible by support from the National Science Foundation, the Society of Women Geographers, the Institute of International Education Boren Fellowship Program, Specialty Groups of the Association of American Geographers, the Center for Global Studies, and several other departments and institutes at Penn State. Since 2010, Emma has also served as a Youth Delegate to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and Commission on the Status of Women (CSW).

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Feminine Melancholy in the Age of Globalization

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Erin Schlumpf, Simon Fraser University

Monday, January 27, 2014

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Joel Rubin, Director of Policy & Gov’t Affairs, Ploughshares Fund

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Thursday, January 23, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Joel Rubin will talk about Iran and advocacy.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Global Rhetorics and Global Intersections: The Old and the New

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Joseph L. Jeyaraj, Penn State

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

101 Old Botany Building, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

This presentation examines older forms of globalization as it has happened in the latter half of the 20th century and newer developments in the past decade or so in the 21st century. While doing so, it examines the role technology played in enabling older forms of globalization in the 20th century and how technology once again has currently made it possible for newer forms of globalization to develop in the past decade or so in the 21st century. The presentation will analyze some of the new global rhetorics, intersections, and trends that that have emerged in global formations such as the larger global south, BRICS, etc. It will also study the role of communication and writing in maintaining new global formations and trends. Of particular interest will be various modes of communication leading to the production, dissemination, framing, and reframing of information, and disinformation in various ways. Of similar interest will be the manner in which information is artificially regulated in some places and its impact on the manner in which globalization occurs in those contexts.  

Dr. Joseph Jeyaraj is visiting faculty in the English Department at The Pennsylvania State University. He specializes in Technical and Professional Writing and Communication and the larger field of Writing and Rhetoric, Engineering Communication, Postcolonial Theory, and on matters related to cross cultural communication and globalization. He has published in various places some of which are College Composition and Communication,Journal of Business and Technical Communication, Technical Writing Quarterly, and Pretexts: Literary and Cultural Studies. His latest work, "Engineering and Narrative: Literary Prerequisites as Indirect Communication for Technical Writing," is forthcoming in Journal of Technical Writing and Communication 44.2 (2014).

Richard Alley, Penn State

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Thursday, January 16, 2014

Executive Education Building (adjacent to the Nittany Lion Inn) 

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Dr. Richard Alley (Department of Geosciences) will talk about the issue of climate change.

This lecture is sponsored by the School of International Affairs and the Center for Global Studies.

Castling the King: Institutional Sequencing and Regime Change

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Matthew Wilson, Penn State

Thursday, January 16, 2014

124 Sparks, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

An increasing focus in the comparative research on modern autocracies is on the institutions by which different forms of authoritarianism govern. In terms of formal political institutions--the rules and expectations by which politics is conducted and society operates--non-democracies have displayed a remarkable diversity and survivability. This study attempts to explain the relative benefits of authoritarian institutions--particularly the legislature--in situations with high uncertainty.

Matthew Wilson is an advanced doctoral student in the Department of Political Science at Penn State. The research for his dissertation has been supported by a grant from the Center for Global Studies, the Penn State Center for Democracy Studies, the College of Liberal Arts, and the National Science Foundation.  His research interests include the study of authoritarianism, comparative political institutions, and democratization. His present work concerns domestic conflict and the prospects for peace and stability. He is also focused on political methodology, particularly as it regard issues of time dependence. He has a regional interest in the politics of Latin America.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

World Stories Alive! Tales in Many Tongues

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Saturdays starting January 11, 2014

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Schlow Library, State College

January 11 Chinese
January 18 Spanish
January 25 Hebrew
February 1 Russian
February 8 German
February 15 Hindi
March 1 Turkish
March 22 Japanese
March 29 Portuguese
April 5 French
April 12 Arabic

From Anthology to Archive: Reed’s Osiris, Pound’s Mumbo Jumbo

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Jeremy Braddock, Cornell University

Monday, December 9, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Latina/o Literature Unbound

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Ralph Rodriguez, Brown University

Monday, December 2, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Turkey: Challenges, Predicaments, Opportunities, and Prospects 

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Professor Sukran N. Atadeniz, Yeditepe University (Istanbul)

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

124 Sparks, 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Professor Sukran Nilvana Atadeniz is Dean of The School of Economics and Administrative Sciences at Yeditepe University. She has published research papers on Production Planning & Control, Quality, and Supply Chain Management.  She has also served as a supply chain consultant to various global firms. After an historical overview of the economic and social issues leading to the current state of affairs in Turkey, Dr. Atadeniz will provide some insight into the Turkish higher education system and Yeditepe University.

Careers in Geopolitical Intelligence and Analysis

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Speaker Roundtable and Reception

Monday, November 18, 2013

Katz Auditorium, Rm. 112

Presentation 4:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Reception 5:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Are you a student with a strong passion for international affairs and information analysis? If so, come and learn from experts in the field about what it takes to succeed in intelligence and what critical skills potential employers are looking for.

Our featured speakers are:

  • Don Shemanksi, 23-year veteran of the United States' Foreign Service including postings in Italy, Cyprus, Germany, and Pakistan
  • John Hodgson, Principal Investigator for the Strategic and Global Security Proram and the Project Manager for Office of Military and Security Programs
  • Scott Gartner, Professor of International Affairs and researcher in the fields of U.S. national security and wartime assessment

*Please RSVP for the reception by Wednesday, November 13th, to .*

Creating the Self and Artistic Production in Immigration: Les Films Albatros in Montreuil and Association CRICAO in Toulouse

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Anna Navrotskaya, French and Francophone Studies, Penn State

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Is there such a thing as “true identity”? Is it created or discovered? Is it a solitary endeavor of an individual consciousness to achieve its “authentic state”, as thought Martin Heidegger, or is it a continuous work both conditioned and necessitated by the relationship with the other, as suggested Emmanuel Lévinas? Is it ever-lasting or ever-changing? All these questions are essential for any attempt to approach the role of creativity in the process of self-identification. Artistic production, and specifically, artistic production in immigration or exile, is not an exception to be considered separately from everyday life, but an example that can clarify human way of being in the world. This presentation will attempt to demonstrate the possibility to consider creativity as one of the fundamental elements of human condition, which in its turn would allow seeing art as an integral part of our everyday existence rather than an exceptional activity for the chosen few. Two research cases that will help to support and illustrate the theory are those of Russian filmmakers who worked in Montreuil and Paris in 1920s and 1930s – Les Films Albatros, and musicians and storytellers from Francophone Africa in nowadays Toulouse – Association CRICAO.

Anna is a doctoral candidate (ABD) in the Department of French and Francophone Studies, whose dissertation treats the questions of creativity, self-identification, and artistic production in immigration. Her main research interests include performance theory, philosophy of art, theater studies and film theory. She has long been fascinated by the process of myth-creation and published an article related to the subject in the Cahiers du Monde Russe (46/1-2, January-June 2005, p. 297-304) entitled “Aleksandr Nevskii: Hagiography and National Biography”.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Film screening: Girl Rising

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Monday, November 11, 2013

Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library, 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

The film Girl Rising aims to raise awareness and advocate for eliminating the barriers to education for girls in developing countries.  When a girl is educated, the cycle of poverty can be broken in just one generation, however, millions of girls around the world face barriers to education that boys do not.  When these barriers are removed-such as early and forced marriage, domestic slavery, sex trafficking, and gender violence- a girl has access to a better life for herself, her family, her community, and creates a safer and more prosperous world for all.

The film follows nine girls in developing countries who have faced a number of barriers to their education, such as bond labor, sexual assault, and early marriage. Most of the girls featured in the film are currently obtaining an education while a few are among the 66 million girls currently out of school (2012 EFA Global Monitoring Report).Their stories are told through the words of an acclaimed writer from her native country.  All of the stories are true although the writer had some liberty when deciding what she wanted to highlight.  Girl Rising captures each girl’s dreams, their voices, and their remarkable lives despite being born into unforgivable circumstances.

This film is at the center of the “Girl Rising” campaign of the same name, which has traveled around the world to witness strength of the human spirit and the power of education to change the world.  When one girl in a developing country is educated, she is able to build a strong foundation for generations to come.  The campaign is a grassroots global action movement that has established relationships with nonprofit organizations that drive donations to programs that help girls get in school and stay in school.  They work together to change minds, lives, and policy so all girls receive what they deserve: an education and a better life.

World Theatre and the Common Ground of Global Modernity

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Glenn Odom, Rowan University

Monday, November 11, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

World on Trial: 2004 French Headscarf Law K-12 Teacher's Workshop

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View the World On Trial page

Saturday, November 9, 2013

8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 

114 Katz Building, University Park Campus

Family Night: Owls give a Whoot

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Tuesday, November 5, 2013

5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania, 112 W. Foster Ave., #1

State College, PA

Join the teams at Penn State's America Reads and Center for Global Studies as we explore the topic of nutrition through story time, educational hands-on activities, and an exploration of global issues and concepts. Free Admission to the Discovery Space exhibits only during Family Nights.

This Year's Nobel Winner: Alice Munro

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Charlotte Eubanks, Penn State; Rosemary Jolly, Penn State; Rebecca Zwanzig, Penn State

Monday, November 4, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

The Persian Period at Ashkelon in Light of Recent Excavations

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Sara Hoffman, History & Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Penn State

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

101 Old Botany, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

The ancient city of Ashkelon, a large port on the coast of modern Israel, played a critical role in trade networks that spanned the Mediterranean world. However, even as the city prospered because of these international connections, its economic significance also caused it to become entangled in broader political conflicts. In the late Iron Age, the Neo-Babylonians destroyed Ashkelon, and the site lay abandoned under ash and debris until it was rebuilt during the Persian Period. Recent work at Ashkelon by the Leon Levy Expedition has focused on clarifying the nature of this settlement. This talk presents recent finds from the excavation of a Persian Period neighborhood at Ashkelon and explores the significance of this material for the political and economic history of the southern Levant.   

Sara Hoffman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History and the Department of Classics & Ancient Mediterranean Studies at Penn State. She is also a member of the archaeological field staff of the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon. Her research interests include contacts between Egypt and the Levant, political rhetoric in the prophetic literature of the Hebrew Bible, and ancient Near Eastern economy.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Family Night: Pumpkins

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Tuesday, October 29, 2013

5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania, 112 W. Foster Ave., #1

State College, PA

Join the teams at Penn State's America Reads and Center for Global Studies for story time, educational hands-on activities, and an exploration of global issues and concepts. Free Admission to the Discovery Space exhibits only during Family Nights.

Comparative Literature From Below: South to South Comparisons

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Simon Gikandi, Princeton University

Monday, October 28, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Metalepsis in Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric

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Rita Copeland, University of Pennsylvania

Monday, October 21, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Inconsistent input and amount of exposure: child language acquisition of Fering, a dialect of North Frisian

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Alison Eisel Hendricks, German & Slavic Languages and Literatures, Penn State

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

430 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Sociolinguistics has focused on how children master variability in language, predictable alternations like the differences between “I will eat my vegetables” and “I’m gonna eat my vegetables”.  However, little research has explored how children learn inconsistency, or unpredictable aspects of language. Recent findings using mini-artificial languages suggest that when presented with inconsistent input, adults match the statistical patterns in their input, whereas children regularize inconsistency. That is, children produce a more systematic language rather than continuing inconsistency (Hudson Kam & Newport, 2005, 2009). However, these studies are limited by their scope and cannot determine whether regularization represents a general pattern of acquisition or only its early stages. Therefore, I present research from a study on child acquisition of morphology in Fering, a dialect of the minority language North Frisian spoken in northern Germany, thus testing the previous findings in a naturalistic environment. By investigating the acquisition of the inconsistently produced feature grammatical gender by children with varying levels of input, this research distinguishes between the roles of inconsistency and quantity of input.

Originally from Southern California, Alison Eisel Hendricks earned her B.A. in Philosophy with a minor in German from Occidental College. She is currently a fifth year PhD. student in Language Science and German Applied Linguistics at Penn State. With support from the Fulbright Commission, the Center for Global Studies, and the National Science Foundation, Alison spent last year living in northern Germany, conducting research on North Frisian, a Germanic language spoken in northern Germany. Her research focuses on how children acquire morphology, including grammatical gender and plural marking.

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Family Night: Nutrition

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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania, 112 W. Foster Ave., #1

State College, PA

Join the teams at Penn State's America Reads and Center for Global Studies as we explore the topic of nutrition through story time, educational hands-on activities, and an exploration of global issues and concepts. Free Admission to the Discovery Space exhibits only during Family Nights.

An Ontology of Women's Labor: He-Yin Zhen and Anarcho-Feminism in Early Twentieth-Century China

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Rebecca Karl, New York University

Monday, October 14, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

The Backlash Against Indigenous Rights and the Return of Indigenismo Under the Citizen’s Revolution in Ecuador (2006-Present)

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Carmen Martínez Novo, University of Kentucky

Monday, October 7, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

CGS booth at Downtown State College Fall Festival

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Saturday, October 5, 2013

Allen Street, 10 - 3 p.m. 

The CGS booth will showcase mehndi, the art of henna design. Visitors will have the opportunity to create their own designs on paper and have them interpreted in henna.

Memory and Theater in Francoist Spain: Fuente Ovejuna to the tune of “Cara al sol”

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Christopher Oechler, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, Penn State

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

430 Burrowes, 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Emboldened by Nationalist success in the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), fascist directors, playwrights, and critics sought to revitalize the stagnant national theater and promote the values associated with the newly formed authoritarian regime. The memory of Spanish theater, particularly the remembering and restaging of seventeenth-century comedias, became a crucial part of this project. One play stands at the center of the debates over the theater's political and aesthetic regeneration: Lope de Vega’s Fuente Ovejuna (c. 1612-1614), a history play that dramatizes a village’s fifteenth-century rebellion against a tyrannical overlord. Drawing on press excerpts, editions of the play, and its definitive performance at the Teatro Español in 1944, my talk will examine how these conceptualizations of Fuente Ovejuna epitomized the changing direction of Spanish theater under the Francoist regime and reinforced the interplay of politics, historiography, and aesthetics.

Christopher Oechler is a doctoral student in the Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese. His dissertation explores the overlapping and contradictory roles of history and memory in seventeenth-century Spanish theater. He focuses on the thematic popularity of history in the work of playwrights such as Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, and Calderón de la Barca and analyzes how the dramatization of prominent historical figures, including Charles V and Isabel the Catholic, comments on the structures of court historiography and collective memory during Spain’s imperial decline. His interests also extend to the staging of early modern history plays in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. His research has been made possible through support from the Institute for the Arts and Humanities. 

This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

Family Night: Eric Carle's World

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Tuesday, October 1, 2013

5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania, 112 W. Foster Ave., #1

State College, PA

Join the teams at Penn State's America Reads and Center for Global Studies as we explore the world of Eric Carle through story time, educational hands-on activities, and an exploration of global issues and concepts. Free Admission to the Discovery Space exhibits only during Family Nights.

Christopher Columbus & the Discourse of Empire in the United States

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Elise Bartosik-Velez, Dickinson College

Monday, September 30, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

ACL(x)// E(x)amine

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Friday, September 27, 2013 - Saturday, September 28, 2013

Nittany Lion Inn

Global Penn State: Internationalizing the Campus, College, and Classroom

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Nittany Lion Inn, 8:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. and

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Lewis Katz Building (UP), 8:00 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

The first annual Global Penn State: Internationalizing the Campus, College, and Classroom conference is designed to offer not only the vision of a global university, but to share practical tools in internationalizing the campus, college, and classroom. 

Zen Master Dogen, A Medieval Japanese Monk Well-Versed in Chinese Poetry

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Steven Heine, Florida International University

Monday, September 23, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Flying Fish (Igillena Maluwo) Film Screening and Video conferenced Q&A with Director Sanjeewa Pushpakumara

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Friday, September 20, 2013

3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library

Flying Fish (Igillena Maluwo), a film by Sri Lankan filmmaker Sanjeewa Pushpakumara, has sparked controversy in the director’s home country.  Despite winning critical acclaim at film festivals around the world since its premiere at the Rotterdam International Film Festival in 2011, the film was immediately banned after its Sri Lankan debut in Colombo in July 2013.  Sri Lanka's Free Media Movement has released an official statement criticizing both the censorship of the film and the government’s ongoing investigation, calling these acts an attempt to “militarise arts and culture.”

Flying Fish depicts a country that has been torn apart by a long civil war.  While the film is far from comfortable to watch, containing images of sex and violence that have been described as “shocking,” it is a candid commentary on the state of the nation in the midst of this 26-year war.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Global Studies, the Migration Studies Project, the Sri Lankan Student Association, and the University Libraries.

Updating the Advising Toolbox: Understanding the Complex Needs of Today's Students

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Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel, 8:30 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.

The twelfth annual Professional Development Conference on Academic Advising on academic advising practices, approaches, and tools that can assist in meeting the needs of students from special populations, such as veterans; underprepared students; students with disabilities; distance learners; returning adult students; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students; and students transitioning from other institutions or through challenging personal circumstances. 

Conference presenters will discuss and share valuable resources, research, and experiences to help attendees better understand and address the complex needs of special student populations, develop and maintain positive advising relationships, and 

update our academic advising toolboxes in the process.

Chinese corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices in Africa: A new puzzle to Chinese decision makers

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Jinghao Lu, Analyst of China-Africa Desk, Frontier Advisory

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

116 Lewis Katz Building, University Park, 6:00 p.m.

China has been Africa's largest trading partner (if not considering EU) since 2009, with bi-lateral trade volume nearly reaching 200 billion USD in 2012. More than 2,000 Chinese companies and over a million Chinese people are active in the continent today. However, whether Chinese trade and investment activities have brought social benefits to Africa is a highly debatable topic these years. Researchers argue that while China brings affordable goods, inexpensive capital and employment opportunities to Africa, the negative impact on local environment, labor relationship and local communities has caused rising tensions. Is China-Africa relationship sustainable in the long run? In this presentation, Lu will strive to explain corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Chinese perspective and in China-Africa business context.

Originally from China, Jinghao Lu completed a Masters of International Affairs and Bachelor of Arts in Sociology as a Schreyer Honors Scholar from the Pennsylvania State University. Jinghao has worked as a China-Africa analyst in Johannesburg, South Africa for the past two years. He planned and led high-level business trips involving Senior Executives of multination corporations seeking marketing and project negotiations in China and organized training programs and business conferences to bridge Africa and China business worlds. During this time has been interviewed by global media such as CNN, CCTV and The Guardian for his expertise on China-Africa trade.

Theorizing Literature from Japan, 1907

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Michael Bourdaghs, University of Chicago

Monday, September 16, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

In 1907 budding novelist Natsume Soseki published Bungakuron (Theory of Literature), his attempt to produce a fully scientific theory of “literature” that would be valid for all places and all times. Relying on what were then the cutting-edge disciplines of psychology and sociology, he generated a model for understanding literature that bears a remarkable resemblance to recent theories of world literature advanced by such figures as Franco Moretti and Pascale Casanova. This talk will sketch in Soseki’s theory, exploring its overlap with those recent theories but also highlighting aspects in which it differs from them in significant ways.

Michael Bourdaghs is Professor of Modern Japanese Literature and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. A native of Minnesota, he received his Ph.D. in East Asian Literature from Cornell University in 1996. He is the author of The Dawn That Never Comes: Shimazaki Toson and Japanese Nationalism (2003) and Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon: A Geopolitical Prehistory of J-Pop (2012). His translation of Kojin Karatani’s The Structure of World History: From Modes of Production to Modes of Exchange is forthcoming from Duke University Press in early 2014.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

Poetry Reading by distinguished American poet

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Tess Gallagher and noted Romanian poet Liliana Ursu

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Foster Auditorium, Pattee Library, 7:00 p.m.

This event is free and open to the PSU community and general public. Sponsored by The Woskob Family Endowment in Ukrainian Studies, the Center for Global Studies, the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages, the Creative Writing Program at PSU,

and Pattee Library.

Standard-Rights Nexus: Transforming Labor Standards into Workers’ Rights

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Jakir Hossain, Penn State

Thursday, September 12, 2013

502 Keller Building, 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Please join us for a talk by Jakir Hossain, Post-Doctoral Scholar with the Center for Global Workers’ Rights. He will speak on the “Standard-Rights Nexus: Transforming Labor Standards into Workers’ Rights.” Jakir is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Bangladesh Studies at the University of Rajshahi.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the Democracy Institute. The Center for Global Workers’ Rights seeks to support research and activism on sweatshops, labor standards, and labor rights by creating a network of scholars and activists working on these issues around the world. For additional information: Jakir Hossain flyer Sept 12 event 2013 .pdf.

Welcome to the Real World: The Importance of Internships

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

Room 116, Lewis Katz Building, 5:45 p.m.

Taimoor Choudhry (School of International Affairs/Law) will discuss his recent internship in Palestine. 

Other topics to be addressed include:

  • Complexities of Palestine-Israel Conflict
  • Gaining experiential skills on one's internship
  • Insights and expectations on achieving career goals
  • Expectations pre and post internship
  • Achieving one's goals in ‘the real world'
  • Networking opportunities and career choice post-internship
  • Your internship and building confidence

This event is co-sponsored by The Center for Global Studies.

Bones of the Butterfly: Translating João Guimarães Rosa's Tutaméia

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Thomas Beebee, Penn State

Monday, September 9, 2013

102 Kern, 12:15 p.m.

This lecture is part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon Series.

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