Events

Between Realism and Anti-Imperialism: The Geopolitics of Malcolm X

Lecture
Jan 23, 2019
04:00 PM to 05:30 PM
102 Weaver

Moshik Temkin, Associate Professor of History and Public Policy at Harvard University

Light refreshments will be served.

Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Jan 28, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Ethan Knapp, Ohio State University

Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Feb 04, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Annette Damayanti Lienau, Harvard University

Film Screening of Andrei Rublev – АНДРЕЙ РУБЛЁВ

Russian Film Series
Feb 05, 2019
06:15 PM to 08:00 PM
Foster Auditorium (Paterno Library)

Tracing the life of a renowned icon painter, the second feature by Andrei Tarkovsky vividly conjures the murky world of medieval Russia. This dreamlike and remarkably tactile film follows Andrei Rublev as he passes through a series of poetically linked scenes—snow falls inside an unfinished church, naked pagans stream through a thicket during a torchlit ritual, a boy oversees the clearing away of muddy earth for the forging of a gigantic bell—gradually emerging as a man struggling mightily to preserve his creative and religious integrity. Appearing here in the director’s preferred 183-minute cut as well as the version that was originally suppressed by Soviet authorities, the masterwork Andrei Rublev is one of Tarkovsky’s most revered films, an arresting meditation on art, faith, and endurance.” Credit: https://www.criterion.com/films/300-andrei-rublev

The daughter of one of the two costume designers will be in attendance.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

Rural Youth at the Crossroad: Contemporary Challenges Within Transition Societies in Central Europe

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Feb 06, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Kai Schafft & Renata Horvatek, Penn State

How have rural youth in Central Europe and other transitional regions of the world responded to recent socioeconomic, demographic, and political shifts? What are young peoples’ attitudes toward their rural roots, family, and tradition? What are the spatial, social, family, educational and institutional factors that shape rural youth aspirations for future residence, career, and occupation? How do schools and communities support young people as they develop plans for adult lives, and what are the implications for educational and community-level practice? How do these processes differ regionally, and how might regional economies affect youth decision-making? How do these identities shape rural youth aspirations for the future, their attachment to their home communities, and the ways in which social and political exclusions and inclusions are reinforced, challenged, and/or reconfigured? This talk will discuss an ongoing collaboration to address these questions with researchers from the University of Split in Croatia, as well as with other scholars and researchers in surrounding countries who have joined together in the effort to compile an edited volume.

Between a Stone and a Hard Place: Stanlake Samkange's Turn to Philosophy

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Feb 11, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Jeanne-Marie Jackson, Johns Hopkins University

Film Screening of Honor Diaries

Arabic Film Series
Feb 13, 2019
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium (Paterno Library)

Honor Diaries is a documentary which follows nine female activists in the Muslim and non-Muslim world, working to better the health and well-being of women. Issues addressed include female genital mutilation, violence against women, honor killings, forced marriage, and lack of access to education. The film originally premiered at the 2013 Chicago International Film Festival and won the Interfaith Award for Best Documentary at the St. Louis International Film Festival.

A paneled discussion will follow the film.

Watch the trailer here.

Remixing History

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Feb 18, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Carla Nappi

Postsocialist Locales and Global Dreams: The Minimalist Approach in Romanian and Chinese Cinema

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Feb 20, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Victoria Lupascu, Penn State

Lupascu's talk with analyze the transnational imaginaries of migrant workers and students as represented in Constantin Popescu’s The Laughing Yellow Face and Li Hong’s Out of Phoenix Bridge and will position the cultural creation of such figures in the context described by postsocialism in Romania and China. Drawing on the history of cinematic aesthetics during transitional times by Jason McGrath and Andrei Gorzo, Lupascu theorizes minimalism as a genre with heuristic capacity in portraying postsocialist contexts. A reaction to the miserabilist genre, minimalism constructs these figures as points of intersection between multiple means of communication and modes of existence conditioned by flows of capital. The epistemological and ontological ruptures of transitioning from socialism to postsocialism are embedded in the visual delineation of infrastructure and communication lines that condition human connections as seen in Popescu’s and Li’s films. Identity and subjectivity formation practices are central to these films and, she argues, bear the brunt of the transitional operations. Lupascu juxtaposes Romanian and Chinese films not for common traits generated by common historical experiences, but for the contribution their analysis brings to our understanding of the figure of migrant workers and students in relation to minimalism as an aesthetic practice closely imbricated with postsocialist and global cultural experiences.


Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Feb 25, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Charlotte Eubanks

Laughtivism – the Power of Humor in Nonviolent Struggle

Lecture
Feb 26, 2019
04:30 PM to 05:45 PM
Katz Auditorium, University Park

What do jokes have to do with revolutions? People would argue that revolutionaries should be solemn and serious because they are dealing with serious issues. However, studies have showed that the chance of success is doubled when the leader and others in the movement are happier and less obsessed with keeping a serious visage around-the-clock.

Humor is a powerful weapon in social movements. This is especially true when you are up against some of the world's toughest and most serious dictators. Humor melts fear and without fear, dictators cannot survive.

Not only that, but most movements that use humor and satire as part of their approach, appear "cool" and become popular quickly. This allows the movement to grow exponentially, and amassing people power is a crucial component to the success of a social movement. It's also difficult for opposition to reply to a joke or a satirical jab in an intelligent manner. However, not responding is just as risky, which leaves the opponent in a dicey situation and gives you the upper hand.

Srdja will discuss different ways of using humor as a strategy, in the form of nonviolent movements. He promotes the idea that nonviolent revolutions work and can help make the world a more peaceful and democratic place.


Srdja Popovic is the Founder and Executive director of the Center for Applied Nonviolent Actions and Strategies (CANVAS), a non-profit organization based in Belgrade, Serbia that aims to teach the use of nonviolence to make a change.

He was born and raised in Belgrade, Serbia (then part of Yugoslavia), in 1973. Popovic played the guitar in a rock band and graduated from the Faculty of Biology in Belgrade, holding a Master’s degree (MA) in animal ecology. Since his early twenties, he has focused on activism, democracy and human rights issues.

In 1998, Popovic founded the student movement “Otpor!” (“Resistance!”) which played a crucial role in ousting president Slobodan Milosevic, former Serbian dictator accused of war crimes. After Milosevic was defeated in 2000, Popovic was elected to the Serbian Parliament where he served from 2000 until 2004.

Following his career in the Serbian Parliament, Popovic went on to found CANVAS, acting as its executive director ever since. CANVAS was created with the intent of teaching people all over the world about how to be successful in nonviolent conflict. So far, the organization has worked with activists from 46 different countries, spreading the knowledge of the nonviolent strategies and tactics used by Otpor! worldwide.

He is currently the 53rd Rector of the University of St Andrews. He commenced the role of the University Rector for a period of 3 years from November 2017.

Apart from being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2012, Popovic was listed as one of the "Top 100 Global Thinkers" of 2011 by the Foreign Policy Magazine. And in 2014 he was listed as a "Young Global Leader" by the World Economic Forum in Davos. Popovic is also the author of the recent book Blueprint for Revolution.

For more information visit: http://canvasopedia.org/

Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Mar 11, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Marilia Librandi-Rocha

Assal Eswed (Black Honey)

Arabic Film Screening
Mar 13, 2019
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
TBA

Location TBA

A 30 years old Egyptian goes back to Egypt after living in America for 20 years, where he has a hard time coping with the difference, Specially after he loses his identity and all his money and becomes stuck in Egypt. Description provided by IMDB.

Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Mar 18, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Celso Castilho

"Behind the Decorations at Vincennes:" Indochinese Activists against the 1931 French Colonial Exposition

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 20, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Elizabeth Tuttle, Penn State

In 1931, France held an elaborate colonial fair where patrons could visit a condensed version of the French empire in Paris’ park Vincennes. Organizers recreated indigenous dwellings and religious structures from across the empire in order to celebrate the state’s vision of a “greater France.” In its six-month run, the colonial exposition attracted millions of visitors from Paris, France’s provinces, and beyond. Even with such popular and financial success, there were still groups who spoke out against this celebration of the French imperial project. In particular, Indochinese militants, often working with French Communist Party members, protested inhumane conditions for colonial workers both in the colonies and at the fair in Vincennes. How did these activists spread their message? Who was their audience and to what extent were they successful in countering governmental propaganda? To answer these questions, Tuttle will analyze official surveillance documents as well as the tracts and pamphlets written and distributed by Indochinese militants during the run-up to the fair’s opening. Ultimately, Tuttle argues that the 1931 colonial exposition became an ideological battleground between colonial administrators and a small number of activists determined to change public opinion by exposing the violence at the heart of French colonialism.


Mythologies of Realism and Modernism: African Literature and the Cold War

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Mar 25, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Monica Popescu

Dreyfus in Algeria

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Apr 01, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

David Fieni

Insurgents of Academe: Historicizing Public Humanities in the African Diaspora

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Apr 08, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Roopika Risam

Scapegoats: Livestock and Indigenous Peoples in Sixteenth-Century New Spain

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Apr 10, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Chris Valesey, Penn State

The Columbian Exchange, or the transfer of plants and animals between the Old and New Worlds, was a momentous process that followed Spanish colonialism. Yet when it comes to animals, most historians describe this “exchange” as a one-way transfer of European animals like horses, cattle, sheep, pigs, goats, and chickens into the New World. Indigenous peoples seemingly played little-to-no role in facilitating the process and instead appeared as belligerent antagonists to unsupervised livestock. Using court cases and a database of roughly 2,000 animal-grants given to indigenous elites and communities in Mexico, this paper reconstructs indigenous participation in the Columbian Exchange. In many ways, European animals in these legal sources functioned as “scapegoats” for broader issues like authority, autonomy, labor, and a changing ecosystem.


How Labor NGOs Organize Workers Collectively under an Authoritarian Regime: The Case of China

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Apr 17, 2019
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Elaine Sio-ieng Hui, Penn State

Save the Date! Comparative Literature Lecture Series

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Apr 22, 2019
12:05 PM to 01:15 PM
102 Kern

Cruie Virag

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