Events

Sexuality, Disability, and Aging: Queer Temporalities of the Phallus

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Sep 25, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Jane Gallop, University of Wisconsin

Captain Abu Raed (2014)

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Sep 27, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

An airport janitor who finds a pilot's hat discovers his calling as he forms a friendship with a group of poor children who are persuaded that he is a true airline pilot.

Avant-gardism Against Itself: 'Conversation' and the Reader Critic in the Little Review

Comparative Literature Lecture Series
Oct 02, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alan Golding, University of Louisville

Bunce Island: A Ghost Town of the Atlantic Slave Trade

African Studies Seminar
Oct 04, 2017
12:30 PM to 02:00 PM
216 Willard Building

Professor Joseph Opala

Professor Joseph Opala has done research for more than 40 years on Bunce Island, an 18th century British slave castle in Sierra Leone.  Unlike other slave castles in West Africa, Bunce Island has a strong historical link to the United States.  It is also far more isolated than most castles, and when he began his research in 1976, very few foreign visitors went there, and the local people believed that a dangerous spirit occupied the island, and were terrified to go there.  Opala will explain his research on Bunce Island’s history, oral history, and archaeology.  He will also explain his public history initiatives that helped bring this remarkable site to popular attention in both Sierra Leone and the United States.

New Media in India: From Fad to Fundamental?

Oct 05, 2017
01:00 PM to 02:30 PM
Foster Auditorium (Pattee)

Dr. Sunetra Sen Narayan, Indian Institute of Mass Communication

Dr. Shalini Narayanan, Independent Communications Consultant

New media is shaping the public discourse in India today. What are the implications of this for the world's largest democracy? And for development? Who is getting left out of the new media equation? Given the sheer numbers and diversity of India, how do we go about regulating it? This study aims to map the changing contours of India's fascinating new mediascape.

Sunetra Sen Narayan has over 25 years’ experience related to communications, spanning advertising, print journalism, documentary film production and teaching.  She has been educated at Delhi University where she studied economics and Pennsylvania State University where she earned her Masters in Telecommunications studies and her Doctorate in Mass Communication. 

She is currently Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi. She has over 15 years teaching experience. She has been the editor of the academic journal, Communicator, India’s oldest scholarly communication journal. Prior to this she has been a print journalist, writing on business and travel in India. She has authored the book: Globalization and Television, a Study of the Indian Experience 1990-2010, Oxford University Press (2014).  And more recently, co-edited India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media (Sage, 2016). 

Shalini Narayanan, D.Phil., is an independent Communications Consultant with over two and a half decades of experience in the government and non-government sectors. She was part of the Indian civil service for 23 years, before taking voluntary retirement in 2013. During that time, she worked at the news division of the public broadcaster, Prasar Bharati, both in television and radio, for over a decade. She also worked at DAVP, the Central government’s advertising agency and as Editor of the only government-run newspaper for jobs, Employment News. As Associate Professor at the Indian Institute of Mass Communication, New Delhi, she headed two departments and conducted research. Post-retirement, she has contributed to Non-Government Organisations in diverse fields such as digital financial inclusion, substance abuse and mental health. 

Her co-edited book India Connected: Mapping the Impact of New Media was published by Sage Publications in September, 2016.

The Ancestors Return: Three Gullah Homecomings to Sierra Leone

Lecture
Oct 05, 2017
06:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Professor Joseph Opala

The Gullah people of coastal South Carolina and Georgia have retained more African cultural heritage than any other black community in the U.S.  Professor Joseph Opala has shown that many of the Gullahs’ ancestors were brought from Sierra Leone, and over the past 30 years he has organized three “Gullah Homecomings” to Sierra Leone, each involving Gullah people with provable connections to that country.  Opala will describe the historical links that led to these homecomings, and the responses of Gullahs and Sierra Leoneans as they confronted their common heritage.  He argues that “homecomings” of this sort can be valuable research tools for uncovering information on the African diaspora.

Professor Opala's visit is sponsored by the PSU African Studies Program, and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Studies.

Chinese Religious Citizenship: A Comparative Study of Buddhist, Islamic, and Christian Religious academies in Republican China

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Oct 18, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Bin Chen, Penn State

Bin Chen's talk seeks to present Chinese the main argument of my dissertation. In twentieth-century China, Republican regimes and ruling elites largely excluded religion from their visions of modern China. The state and elites considered citizens of Republican China as a group of “new people” who were fully committed to modernity and free from “backward” superstitions or belief. However, the concept of citizenship was open to debate. While the state and elites did not include religion in their visions of modern citizens, the religious institutions responded through religious academies. In these academies, religious institutions constructed religious citizenship. They nurtured a new group of students who unquestionably defined themselves as members of modern China yet their markers of citizenship were inevitably connected to religion.

Different religious academies constructed religious citizenship differently. Buddhist academies were firmly adherent to the political rhetoric of Republican regimes. Buddhism academies and their students presented themselves as preservers of essential Chinese culture. They argued that Republican regimes should patronize Buddhism and Buddhism was useful for nation-building, including nurturing “citizens.” The Islamic academies, in particular, the Chengda Teachers’ Academy, incorporated citizenship with Islamic religious practices. They argued that to be a good citizen was crucial for a Hui to be a good Muslim. Christian academies, like the Suzhou Yates Academy, presented the Christian education as the ideal education for citizens. Students who graduated from Yates might not be converts, but their understandings of citizenship were deeply influenced by Christian civic ethics: good citizens should break away from China’s superstitious past, arm themselves with scientific knowledge, and actively engage in sports and public affairs.

Bin Chen is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the Penn State University. He is currently working on a dissertation that compares Islamic, Buddhist, and Christian religious academies and their interactions with the broader society. The dissertation seeks to alter our understanding of China’s modernization, arguing that the modernization process in modern China was inextricably linked with religious institutions.

Arabic Film Screening

CGS Arabic Film Series
Oct 24, 2017
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Photography and Migration in Interwar Senegal and France

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 08, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Johann Le Guelte, Penn State

Photography was a central tool of the French colonial bureaucracy. Following World War I and the massive deployment of Senegalese soldiers (tirailleurs sénégalais) to the French metropole, authorities implemented various strategies to control the movements of colonial subjects. In this talk, I will explore the politics of administrative photography (identification cards, livrets, passports etc.) in interwar Senegal and France, and its effects on intercolonial migrations. My archival research conducted in both Senegal and France and funded by CGS demonstrates that the empire relied on photography to act as a deterrent to migration. However, colonial subjects used photography in alternative ways in order to bypass and subvert new administrative restrictions.

Johann Le Guelte is a fifth-year doctoral Candidate in the Department of French and Francophone Studies at Penn State. His dissertation, Uncovering the Colonial Lens: Creation and Subversion of the French Visual Empire, explores how France, during the 1920s and 1930s, developed a visual empire as part of its colonial apparatus. During these years, the colonial state was involved to an unprecedented extent in the production and dissemination of colonial photographs, thereby fixing the stereotypical representation of the colonial other. In turn, however, he looks at photographers in French West Africa who created spaces of photographic "resistance" (a different esthétique de soi). By focusing on one colony – Senegal – he shows how the appropriation by locals of image-production created a visual counter-discourse, inviting the bodies of those under colonial rule to overturn the Western state’s perpetuation of a constructed colonial “savagery.

The Causal Architecture in Naturally Acquired German by Adult Korean Native Speakers

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Nov 15, 2017
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Hyoun-A Joo, Penn State

In this lecture, Hyoun-A is presenting her dissertation research where she is asking how the German syntactic structure found representation in the minds of Korean immigrants in Germany. In the 70s, many Koreans moved to Germany for work purposes and they acquired German predominantly naturally by living and working in Germany rather than through formal instruction. Today, after more than 40 years, this population’s L2 German acquisition has reached a stable state and they developed into very different levels of proficiency. This presents a favorable situation to investigate the syntactic structure of German as it may have taken different forms in the minds of natural L2 acquirers. By pursuing this research, Hyoun-A aims to evaluate theories about the development of the German syntactic structure with insights from a matured clausal architecture, thereby advancing our understanding of how languages are acquired.

Hyoun-A is a graduate student in the German Department pursuing a dual degree in German Applied Linguistics and Language Science. Her current research interests involve second language acquisition and maintenance, as well as syntax. Having grown up within two languages and cultures, Hyoun-A developed a natural interest for bi-/multilingualism, which led her to work in Berlin, Seoul, and now Penn State. Her life and work experience in three different countries crucially shaped her sensitivity for ‘global citizenship’ that she also integrates into her research.

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