Events

Liberal Arts Career Week

College of Liberal Arts event
Jan 22, 2018 09:00 AM to
Jan 26, 2018 03:00 PM

Liberal Arts Career Week (January 22-26, 2018) is a week-long event designed to provide students with opportunities to develop professional skills and provide networking opportunities that will support their future career paths. By participating in this week’s employer and alumni panels, workshops, and networking events, students can learn skills needed to embark on their career journey and achieve success in their professional lives.

Join the Liberal Arts Career Enrichment Network and take advantage of all the great events and networking opportunities!

More information about this event…

Climate Change

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Jan 24, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Richard Alley, Penn State

Dr. Richard Alley, Evan Pugh Professor in the Penn State Department of Geosciences at the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, will speak about climate change at the Penn State School of International Affairs’ spring colloquium.

Alley has authored more than 170 refereed scientific publications about the relationships between Earth's cryosphere and global climate change. Alley testified about climate change before the U.S. House Committee on Science and Technology in 2007 and 2010. His 2007 testimony was due to his role as a lead author of "Chapter 4: Observations: Changes in Snow, Ice and Frozen Ground" for the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). He has participated in the joint United Nations World Meteorological Organization panel since 1992, having been a contributing author to both the second and third IPCC assessment reports.

Jobs and Internships in the Government

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
124 Sparks Building

Join a recruiter from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management to learn more about the government’s recruitment and hiring processes for full-time and internships along with helpful tips for navigating USAjobs.gov.

Federal Resume Workshop

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
03:15 PM to 04:15 PM
124 Sparks Building

Join a recruiter from the U.S. Office of Personnel Management to learn how to write a federal resume and when to use it.

Government & Social Services Employer Panel and Networking

Liberal Arts Career Week
Jan 24, 2018
05:30 PM to 07:00 PM
134 HUB

Join recruiters from a variety of organizations within government and social services in a panel discussion. Recruiters will be available after for one on one questions. Organizations include U.S. Office of Personnel Management, Centre County Children & Youth Services, PA State Police, & more.

World Stories Alive! Russian

World Stories Alive! Series
Jan 27, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Title TBD

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Jan 29, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Alex Cigale, Queens College of the City University of New York

An Evening with Lisa Ko

Author Visit
Jan 29, 2018
06:30 PM to 08:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Lisa Ko, Author

Join us for an evening with Lisa Ko author of National Book Award Finalist, The Leavers. Ko will discuss her novel and answer readers’ questions. Presented in partnership with Schlow Library and the Diversity Council within Penn State’s Office of Outreach and Online Education.

Nation Building

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Jan 31, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Peter Van Buren, author and 24-year veteran of the State Department

Peter Van Buren is a retired 24-year veteran of the U.S. Department of State. He spent a year in Iraq as a State Department Foreign Service Officer serving as Team Leader for two Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs). Now in Washington, he writes about Iraq and the Middle East at his blog, We Meant Well. His first book, We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People, was published in 2011, and his latest book, Ghosts of Tom Joad: A Story of the #99Percent, has just been published.

World Stories Alive! Turkish

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 03, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Exit/Interzone: Postlanguage, the Typewriter, and Angloarabic Cinepoetry

Comparative Literature Luncheon Series
Feb 05, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:30 PM
102 Kern

Yasser Elhariry, Dartmouth College

Discussion on Religion

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 07, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Roger Finke, Penn State

Roger Finke is a Penn State professor of sociology and religious studies in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. He is also the Director of the Association of Religion Data Archives and is the President of the Association for the Sociology of Religion. Professor Finke co-authored two influential books with sociologist of religion Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990: Winners and Losers in Our Religious Economy received the 1993 Distinguished Book Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion. Acts of Faith: Explaining the Human Side of Religion received the 2001 Book Award from the American Sociological Association's Sociology of Religion Section. These books extended what is often called the New Paradigm or the Rational Choice theoretical perspective, conceptualizing denominations as competitors in a religious market. The Churching of America was methodologically noteworthy for demonstrating the utility of quantitative historical data on church membership. Additionally, Finke is the co-author of The Price of Freedom Denied: Religious Persecution and Conflict in the Twenty-first Century and Places of Faith: A Road Trip Across America's Religious Landscape. He is author or co-author of numerous peer-reviewed articles appearing in edited volumes and journals such as American Sociological Review, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Review of Religious Research, Social Science Research, and The Sociological Quarterly.

Professor Finke was the founding director of the American Religion Data Archive, which was renamed as the Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) in 2005. Supported by the Lilly Endowment and the John Templeton Foundation, the ARDA is a diverse, freely-available online digital library offering American and international data files, along with tools and resources to assist educators, journalists, religious congregations, and researchers. Finke is also a Fellow of the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion and a past President of the Association for the Study of Religion, Economics, and Culture.

World Stories Alive! Korean

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 10, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Post-Holocaust Antisemitism and the Psychiatry of Trauma

Feb 12, 2018
05:00 PM to 06:00 PM
Foster Auditorium, Pattee Library

Dr. Dagmar Herzog, City University of New York

In this paper, Professor Herzog will revisit the emotionally and politically charged conflicts among medical professionals in West Germany, the United States, and Israel over reparations for damages to mental health incurred by survivors of the Nazi Holocaust. Emphasizing the resurgence of anti-Semitism and resentment against survivors in the wake of Nazism’s defeat, as well as prominent medical professionals’ hostility toward survivors, she will show how in this context a handful of doctors sympathetic to the survivors eventually were able to develop the concepts of “massive psychic trauma” and “post-traumatic stress disorder.” She will also explore the unexpected consequences arising from the strategic entwining of the causes of Holocaust survivors and veterans of the Vietnam War – and the effects this had as mental health professionals working with survivors of torture in the Latin American dictatorships grappled with the limits of the concept of PTSD.

Dagmar Herzog is Distinguished Professor of History and the Daniel Rose Faculty Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She writes on the histories of religion, the Holocaust and its aftermath, and gender and sexuality. Her most recent book is Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes (2017) and she is currently working on a project entitled Unlearning Eugenics: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Disability in Post-Nazi Europe.

This lectures is co-sponsored by the Department of History, The Rock Ethics Institute, the German Studies Department, the Jewish Studies Program, and the Center for Global Studies.

Peace in the Middle East

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 14, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Husam Zomlot, Palestinian Ambassador to the United States

Studying a Foreign Language in a Globalizing World: The Case of Hindi-Urdu

Feb 16, 2018
03:00 PM to 04:00 PM
157 Hosler

Dr. Richard Delacy, Harvard University

Richard Delacy teaches Hindi-Urdu in the Department of South Asian Studies at Harvard University. He writes about contemporary South Asian culture and society, in particular literary fiction and Bollywood cinema. He completed a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in South Asian Languages and Civilizations and before this a Masters in Indian History in Australia, where he was born and raised before settling in the US. He has authored several books related to the teaching of Hindi and Urdu, including a Hindi-English/English-Hindi dictionary, and is currently working on a book on commercial Hindi cinema (Bollywood), as well as one on the contemporary Hindi literary novel. He has been traveling to India for almost thirty years and has spent an aggregate of almost eight years there over more than thirty visits. (Source: https://alumni.harvard.edu/travel/leaders/richard-delacy)

Nasser’s Republic, The Making of Modern Egypt

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Feb 20, 2018
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

Nasser’s Republic, The Making of Modern Egypt is the first film for an American audience about one of the Arab world’s most transformative leaders. Seemingly coming out of nowhere, Gamal Abdel Nasser soon became a symbol of Arab progress and dignity. From 1952 to 1970, he challenged Western hegemony abroad, confronted Islamism at home, and faced deep divisions among the Arabs. He also established the region's first military authoritarian regime. A man of enormous charisma and ambition, Nasser had begun a revolution he could not complete. But his dreams, dilemmas and decisions continue to shape the current generation.

Producer Michal Goldman began work on this project before the January 2011 uprisings in Egypt and continued filming through General Sisi’s first year in power. During this period of turmoil, Egyptians argued passionately about their history as a way to see what course to follow in the future. It is their voices – peasants and professors, secularists and Islamists – that drive this film.

Global Commons

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 21, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Leif Trana, Economic Minister with the Norwegian Embassy

Leif Trana, Minister Counsellor for Economic Affairs at the Embassy of Norway will present "Managing the Global Commons: Norway's Interests in the Arctic" as part of the Penn State School of International Affairs’ spring colloquium. The Arctic is Norway’s top policy issue.

Before joining the Embassy of Norway in August 2014, Trana serviced as the director of the section for organizational development in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Oslo. In this position, he focused on how to align the resources used at various embassies with Norwegian interests in the corresponding country or organization. Before that, he was deputy director int eh same section. He spent five years working on World Trade Organization matters focusing on the agricultural and the National Agri-Marketing Association negotiations in the Doha Development Agenda. Trana is a career foreign-service officer who has served in Riyadh and Washington. He received his M.A. in economics from the University of Oslo.

Survivors: Psychological Trauma and Memory Politics in Hiroshima and Auschwitz

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Feb 21, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Ran Zwigenberg, Penn State

In 1962 a young Jewish-American psychiatrist by the name of Robert J. Lifton came to Hiroshima to conduct research on the psychiatric impact of the A-bomb. His research, combined with research on Holocaust survivors and Vietnam veterans was crucial in the making of what is now known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  Lifton’s work was entangled with and contributed to the history of memory in Japan and the west. Based on his award winning book, Hiroshima: the Origins of Global Memory Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2014) as well as more recent research, Ran Zwigenberg’s talk will examine these entanglements and connections between the medical reaction to the Holocaust and Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the politics of memory in both contexts. What stood in the center of both histories were the survivors of the events, who became focal points of growing body of research as well as political symbols. The ‘survivor’, Zwigenberg argues, developed historically as a transnational category that drew on many sources, both within what came to be known as Holocaust discourse and outside of it. The convergence of the histories of Hiroshima and the Holocaust in the late sixties and seventies and the making of the category of PTSD (as well as the subsequent rise of trauma studies) led to the formation of survivorhood as an expansive, universal category that was used beyond the confines of the two cases of mass-killings. 

Ran Zwigenberg is assistant professor at Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on modern Japanese and European history, with a specialization in memory and intellectual history. He has taught and lectured in the United States, Europe, Israel, and Japan, and published on issues of war memory, atomic energy, psychiatry, and survivor politics.  Zwigenberg’s first book, Hiroshima: The Origins of Global Memory Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2014), winner of the 2016 Association for Asian Studies’ John W. Hall book award, deals comparatively with the commemoration and the reaction to the Holocaust and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. For more information on this and other projects, please see https://pennstate.academia.edu/RanZwigenberg

World Stories Alive! Chinese

World Stories Alive! Series
Feb 24, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

The Media

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Feb 28, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Steve Mufson, The Washington Post

Doing Development Right

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 14, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Greg Gottleib, Tufts University

Title TBD

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 14, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Ebony Coletu, Penn State

World Stories Alive! Hindi

World Stories Alive! Series
Mar 17, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Tickling Giants

CGS Arabic Film Screening
Mar 20, 2018
07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Foster Auditorium

In the midst of the Egyptian Arab Spring, Bassem Youssef makes a decision that’s every mother’s worst nightmare... He leaves his job as a heart surgeon to become a full-time comedian.

Dubbed, “The Egyptian Jon Stewart,” Bassem creates the satirical show, AlBernameg. The weekly program quickly becomes the most viewed television program in the Middle East, with 30 million viewers per episode. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart averaged two million viewers.

In a country where free speech is not settled law, Bassem’s show becomes as controversial as it popular. He and his staff must endure physical threats, protests, and legal action, all because of jokes. As Bassem attempts to remain on the air, keep his staff safe, and not get arrested, he continues to hold those in power accountable. Despite increasing danger, the team at AlBernameg employs comedy, not violence, to comment on hypocrisy in media, politics, and religion.

Tickling Giants follows the team of AlBernameg as they discover democracy is not easily won. The young women and men working on Bassem’s show are fearless revolutionaries, who just happen to be really, really funny.

Intelligence and National Security

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 21, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, Former Chief of Staff to U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell

Title TBD

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 21, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Xiaoran He, Penn State

World Stories Alive! German

World Stories Alive! Series
Mar 24, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Dealing with North Korea

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Mar 28, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Evans Revere, Albright Stonebridge Group

Evans J.R. Revere will speak about current policy challenges in North Korea as part of the Penn State School of International Affairs' spring colloquium. Revere is senior director with the Albright Stonebridge Group, providing strategic advice to clients with a specific focus on Korea, China and Japan. Fluent in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, Revere retired from the Foreign Service in 2007 after a distinguished career as one of the U.S. Department of State's top Asia experts. He has extensive experience in negotiations with North Korea.

American Servicemen's Transnational Experience in the China Relief Expedition of 1900

CGS Brown Bag Lecture Series
Mar 28, 2018
12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
157 Burrowes

Xiangyun Xu, Penn State

In June, 1900, the United States, together with several other nations like Great Britain, Japan, Russia, France, and Germany, launched a joint operation to relieve the Chinese Boxers' siege of Western personnel and Chinese Christian converts in Tianjin and Beijing. After this multi-national forces accomplished the above goal, it occupied these two cities for more than a year. Although the United States withdrew its forces early in May, 1901 for the ongoing conflict in the Philippines, the time in China still left a mark on American servicemen. Fighting alongside other forces and encountering them on city streets during the occupation, American servicemen formed their unique opinions of other nationals, perceptions that resurged in later warfare like the Russo-Japanese War of 1904 and the First World War. Besides, they also interacted with Chinese officials and civilians, which both reinforced and modified the concurrent racial stereotypes of Asians in the United States.

Xiangyun Xu obtained both his BA and MA in history from Peking University, China. The course of study there developed his interest in the American encounters with the outside world in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century. Starting from Fall 2014, he has been in the Department of History, Penn State as a PhD student and passed his comprehensive exam in Spring 2016. Since then, he has conducted a number of archival trips for his dissertation. Meanwhile, he also writes some pieces on the American history and politics for the general audience in China.

Why People Rebel - Greed versus Grievance

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 04, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Greg Kruczek, Virginia Tech

Kruczek graduated from Penn State in 2005 with a B.A. in Political Science and B.S. in Professional Golf Management. During time as an undergraduate, spent time in Cairo, Egypt and Beirut, Lebanon studying Arabic and each state's political culture. In Fall 2006 completed intensive Arabic program at the Monterey Institute of International Studies in Monterey, CA. Worked as Research Assistant at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies (Arlington, VA) from 2006-2007. In 2007 served as Information Officer at Georgetown University's Center for Contemporary Arab Studies. After a brief stint in Beirut in late-2007, returned to Penn State for his Masters, graduating from the School of International Affairs in 2009. Master's paper dealt with confessional politics in Lebanon. From 2010-2012 was a lead researcher in Penn State's College of Information Science and Technology on the counter-insurgency component of a Multi-University Research Initiative sponsored by the U.S. Army Research Lab. In 2011 joined the faculty of Susquehanna University as an instructor in the Department of Political Science, teaching classes on world politics and comparative domestic politics. In January 2013 began pursuing Ph.D in Government and International Affairs at Virginia Tech's Washington, D.C. campus under the guidance of Dr. Ariel Ahram. His dissertation topic concerns the Christian response to the Arab Spring.

2018 Penn State-Pittsburgh Undergraduate Research Symposium in Global Studies

Undergraduate Research Symposium
Apr 06, 2018
09:00 AM to 03:00 PM
The Nittany Lion Inn, State College, PA

Global eyes: critical perspectives of an interconnected world

Abstracts due: March 2, 2018

Final papers due: March 28, 2018

The symposium will highlight student research on the complex array of social forces that characterize our increasingly interconnected world and will provide networking for students and faculty who are shaping how we approach these important topics and/or will provide leadership in the study of global issues in the future.  

We encourage a wide variety of research topics on diverse areas including (but not limited to) the economy, gender, health, education, politics, media, nationalism, ethnicity, spirituality, and community. We invite papers from various disciplines within humanities, sciences, social sciences and professional schools that address the theme of interconnectedness. Submissions that employ diverse theories, genres, and methodologies of research in a plurality of historical and geographical contexts are encouraged.

Students selected to present will be notified via email by March 6th; final papers will then be due March 28th by 5:00 p.m.

The Center for Global Studies at Penn State and the University of Pittsburgh’s Global Studies Center and the will host the event April 6, 2018 at The Nittany Lion Inn in State College, PA. The symposium will include a keynote lecture, student presentations and student networking.

Once abstracts are submitted and approved, papers will be clustered according to general themes that emerge. While we are not giving our awards, notable papers from each cluster will be highlighted on the Center for Global Studies’ website.

Do not hesitate to inquire if you have questions about paper topics or symposium logistics.

Penn State students should contact Sarah Lyall-Combs, Associate Director, Center for Global Studies at cgsinfo@psu.edu.

Pittsburgh students should contact Elaine Linn, Assistant Director for Academic Affairs, Global Studies Center at eel58@pitt.edu or (412) 648-2113.

How to Apply

Students must submit an application form and abstract (for help in writing effective abstracts visit here). From the submitted abstracts, a selection committee will determine which participants will be asked to forward finished research papers for participation at the symposium. Please forward finished research papers to Sarah Lyall-Combs at cgsinfo@psu.edu. Students will receive feedback based on specific judging criteria. 

Presenters will be grouped into panel sessions according to categories that emerge from the papers selected.

Preparing for the Symposium

Papers should be 8-10 pages in length and must be double-spaced with citations of at least eight resources (using MLA format). Please format your papers using a one inch margin and a 12-point standard font (Times New Roman and Arial for example).

Student presentations will be limited to 12 minutes with an additional five minutes for questions from faculty and audience. All rooms will be media equipped should you wish to prepare a Powerpoint to accompany your presentation.

A minimum of three judges will read the research papers prior to the event and provide comments. During the presentation sessions, the panel and audience will listen to each student’s presentation and ask questions.

On Digital Colonialism and Monstrosity

Apr 06, 2018
10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library

Morehshin Allahyari, artist

Born and raised in Iran, Morehshin Allahyari is a new-media artist and activist who has lived in the United States since 2007. In this lecture, she will reflect on the relationship between the use of digital technologies and activism, digital colonialism, and monstrosity and refiguring as it relates to her 2015 project Material Speculation: ISIS and its aftermath, as well as to a new in-progress project called She Who Sees the Unknown. She will also posit and contextualize “a position outside” that asks difficult questions and suggests alternative methods.

Co-sponsored by the Palmer Museum of Art, University Libraries, CIMP-3D, Bernard M. Gordon Learning Factory, Center for Global Studies, School of International Affairs, Department of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Central Pennsylvania Society of the Archaeological Institute of America, Rock Ethics Institute, and the Arts and Design Research Incubator (ADRI).

Demography, Fertility and Sustainability

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 11, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Karl Hofmann, Population Services International

Retired U.S. ambassador and SIA advisory board member Karl Hofmann is President and Chief Executive Officer of Population Services International, a Washington-based global health organization.  Mr. Hofmann is former U.S. Ambassador to Togo and Executive Secretary of the State Department.  He also served on President Clinton's National Security Council staff.

World Stories Alive! Igbo

World Stories Alive! Series
Apr 14, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Schlow Library, Downtown State College

Experience stories, songs and art in different languages. Fun for speakers of all languages, including English. World Stories Alive! is a collaborative project brought to you by Schlow Centre Region Library, The Center for Global Studies at Penn State, Bilingualism Matters at Penn State, and Global Connections.

Why America Misunderstands the World

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 18, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Paul Pillar, Georgetown University

Corruption and State Capture

School of International Affairs Lecture Series
Apr 25, 2018
11:15 AM to 12:30 PM
012 Katz

Dr. Vineeta Yadav, Penn State 

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